Workshop

Medical Sociology: Joanna Kempner, Associate Professor of Sociology, Rutgers University

The Daytrippers: Psychedelics, Citizen Scientists, and a Quest to End Pain
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, October 27, 2017 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Education & Inequality: Alec Gershberg, Senior Lecturer in Sociology & Urban Studies, Senior Fellow, Penn GSE, International Educational Development Program, University of Pennsylvania

“The Political Economy of Education Reform in Developing Countries”
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, November 10, 2017 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Culture, Ethnography, and Interaction: Alexander Hoppe, Ph.D. Candidate, Penn Sociology

“Are Your All-American Jeans Made in India? Durkheim and the Double Myth of the Designer"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, November 3, 2017 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Race, Ethnicity, & Immigration: Shantee Rosado, Ph.D. Student, Penn Sociology

"Blanco y Negro: The Role of Language in Second-Generation Latinos’ Racial Ideologies"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, November 17, 2017 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Education & Inequality: Kenneth Shores, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Penn GSE

The Geography of Black White Educational Inequality: Linking Disproportionality across Multiple Educational Domains
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, September 29, 2017 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Abstract:
Using district level data that cover 75 percent of the black public school population, we characterize the extent to which black white gaps in achievement, rates of school disciplinary policy, Advanced Placement (AP) course taking and classification into special education and Gifted and Talented courses are linked across school districts in the United States. We show that gaps in each of these domains are large in magnitude and correlated; districts with large gaps in one area are likely to have large gaps in other areas. Socioeconomic inequality and segregation are strikingly consistent predictors of achievement, discipline, AP course taking and classification gaps. While socioeconomic and segregation variables consistently predict achievement and non-achievement gaps, there is much more unexplained variance for non-achievement outcomes; depending on the outcome, socioeconomic and segregation variables explain  between 1.5 to 3 times as much of the variation in achievement gaps as they do for the other educational outcomes. These findings reveal that underlying and systemic patterns of inequality drive inequalities across multiple educational outcomes; however, unobserved discretionary policies at the district and school levels are more influential for gaps in non-achievement outcomes.

More information as well as Kenneth's CV can be found here

Family & Gender: Janna Besamusca, Ph.D. Candidate in Sociology at the University of Amsterdam

“Effects of motherhood, institutions and social position on women’s employment in 31 high and middle income countries.”
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, September 22, 2017 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Culture, Ethnography, and Interaction: Laura A. Orrico, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Penn State - Abington

People Being People: Everyday Substance Use in a Public Marketplace”
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, September 15, 2017 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Culture, Ethnography, and Interaction: Patricia Tevington, Ph.D. Student, Penn Sociology

“Even if We’re Living in a Cardboard Box” Religious Beliefs, Financial Readiness, and Marital Timelines
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, September 8, 2017 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration Workshop: Angela Simms, Ph.D. Student, Penn Sociology

School Choice, Neoliberalism, and Racial Inequality: How Black and White Parents Manage Schooling in the Cleveland, Ohio, Metropolitan Area
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, April 7, 2017 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Proponents of “school choice” argue that offering parents public school options other than traditional neighborhood schools empowers parents to secure the best education for their children.  But because school choice was introduced into an education system where Black, Latino, and poor parents are more likely to send their children to neighborhood schools that fail to meet state academic proficiency standards, than are their White and middle class peers, and because racial residential segregation persists in most U.S. metropolitan areas, parents’ exercise of choice reflects and reinforces, not ameliorates, already-existing inequality.  School choice itself is constitutive of neo-liberal, or market-based solutions, to the provision of public goods, which transfers responsibility and failure risk from government to families.  While there are studies on students’ performance in traditional and non-traditional public schools, our study contributes an understanding of how choice is exercised and experienced day to day by Black and White parents.  We use interviews with 42 Black and White parents who have children in elementary school in the Cleveland, Ohio, metropolitan area, to compare the processes Black and White parents use to:  (1) decide where to send their children to school and (2) manage daily schooling routines.  We find that, regardless of class background, most White parents send their children to their neighborhood school because they are satisfied with it, while most Black parents seek alternatives because they are not.  As a result, White parents have a “package deal” and Black parents a “parenting tax.”

Full paper can be read here.

Second Year Paper Presentations

Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, April 21, 2017 - 1:00pm - 5:00pm