Workshop

Culture and Interaction: Rachel Ellis, Ph.D. Candidate, Penn Sociology

"Faith Behind Bars: An Ethnographic Study of Religion in a Women's Prison."
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, October 16, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Urban Ethnography: Gordon Douglas, Associate Director, Institute for Public Knowledge, New York University

TBA
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, April 15, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Urban Ethnography: Betsie Garner, Ph.D. Student, Penn Sociology

TBA
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, April 1, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Culture & Interaction: Blair Sackett and Lindsay W. Glassman, Ph.D. Students, Penn Sociology

Lindsay Wood Glassman: “In the Lord’s Hands: Divine Healing and Identity in a Fundamentalist Christian Church” and Blair Sackett: “Not Much We Can Do: Humanitarianism and the Organization of the Refugee Camp”
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, April 22, 2016 - 2:00pm - 3:30pm

Lindsay Wood Glassman
“In the Lord’s Hands: Divine Healing and Identity in a Fundamentalist Christian Church”

Abstract: At Full Truth Calvary Church, members reject modern medicine, avoid prescription glasses, and even refuse to wear seatbelts. To engage in these behaviors would be to follow the "self-life," or a way of living that privileges ones’ own will over God’s. Using data from more than 20 months of ethnographic research at Full Truth, I show that church members’ rejection of modern medicine serves to reinforce group boundaries and identity, and creates a vital congregation. As a group that is not very engaged with "the world," via proselytization or politics (indeed, they eschew both), these findings demonstrate the ways in which fundamentalist religious groups can generate tension with the outside world without much active engagement – an important addendum to subcultural identity theory (Smith 1998).

Blair Sackett
“Not Much We Can Do”: Humanitarianism and the Organization of the Refugee Camp

Abstract: As the number of displaced people around the globe swells, social service provision to refugees has become a crucial social problem around the globe. How do front-line aid workers make decisions on aid allocation in such uncertain contexts? Drawing upon ethnographic observation in a refugee camp and interviews with aid workers in NGOs that assist refugees in Kenya, I argue that contrary to our assumptions about the desirability of worker discretion, aid workers at the frontline seek to minimize discretion in aid allocation in the context of insufficient resources and overwhelming caseloads. Co-workers structure each other’s work, limiting their individual discretion. With contact already limited by the physical layout of service facilities, aid workers further restrict their contact with refugee clients by strictly limiting their scheduling and dynamics of interaction to manage needs and numbers. Together they limit their goals to qualitative achievements measured by successful interactions. In the context of high stakes decisions, limited training, and uncertain environments, goals, and technologies, aid workers welcome these restrictions as useful in reducing emotional fatigue, upholding the mission’s legitimacy and staving off chaos. Those who breach a limit risk censure from colleagues, accusations of fraud and chaos.

 

 

Family & Gender: Miliann Kang, Associate Professor, UMass - Amherst

"Race, Reproduction and Representation: Second-Generation Asian American Mothering and the Global Mommy Wars"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, February 19, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Miliann Kang is Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies and affiliated faculty in Sociology and Asian/Asian American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Her book, The Managed Hand: Race, Gender and the Body in Beauty Service Work won book awards from the National Women’s Studies Association and the American Sociological Association. Her current research is on Asian American women and the racial politics of mothering, for which she received an American Association of University Women American Fellowship. Her writing has been published in Gender and Society, Contexts, Newsweek,Women’s Review of BooksHuffington Post and Meridians.

Urban Ethnography: Ruth Braunstein, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Connecticut

TBA
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, February 12, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

**CANCELED** Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration Workshop

Date: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Education & Inequality: Soo-yong Byun, Associate Professor, The Pennsylvania State University

Global Growth of Shadow Education - Family, School, and National Influences
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, January 29, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Supplemental education, or shadow education, is a salient educational phenomenon with considerable implications for social reproduction of advantage and educational expansion. Focusing primarily on fee-paying out-of-school classes, this study analyzed the 2012 Programme for International Student Assessment data, combined with the country specific information on socioeconomic, cultural, and institutional features, and showed that about one third of all students from in 64 countries/economies across the world use this pure form of shadow education, on average for four hours a week, plus a substantial proportion of students use other forms of shadow education (i.e., private tutoring and after-school lessons) including using two or more services at once. This represents a significant growth in the phenomenon from estimates from the mid-1990s. Further, there are significant variations in shadow education use across countries, ranging from a widely normative practice to rare use.  Multilevel analyses suggest that family socioeconomic status is positively associated with use, whereas achievement is negatively associated. Students in poorer countries more extensively and intensively rely on shadow education than their counterparts in wealthier countries, after controlling for the student background characteristics and other country-level variables. Students in South-Eastern and Eastern Asian countries spend longer time on pursuing shadow education than their counterparts in many other regions. Students in more schooled societies more intensively use shadow education than students in less schooled societies. Together, the findings highlights the importance and complexities of national contexts in understanding cross-national differences in shadow education. 

Family & Gender: Pete Harvey, Ph.D Student, Penn Sociology

TBA
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, January 15, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm