Workshop

Urban Ethnography: Chad Broughton, Senior Lecturer, Public Policy Studies Program, University of Chicago

TBA
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, November 20, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Professionalization Workshop: "How to Prepare for a Conference: CVs, Presentations, and Casual Conversations."

Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, March 25, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Education & Inequality: Yi-Lin Chiang, Ph.D. Candidate, Penn Sociology

TBA
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, November 6, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Family & Gender: Aliya Rao, Ph.D. Student, Penn Sociology

TBA
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, October 23, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

**Start Time Changed** Race, Ethnicity and Immigration: Radha Modi, Ph.D. Candidate, Penn Sociology

"Managing the Racial Middle: South Asians, Skin Color, and the Racial Ethnic Divide"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, October 2, 2015 - 11:00am - 12:30pm

Education & Inequality: Phoebe Ho, Ph.D. Student, University of Pennsylvania and Grace Kao, Professor of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

"'American' at Home, 'Immigrant' at School: The Acculturation and Social Integration of Mixed-Nativity Families"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, September 18, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Though mixed-nativity families – those with one immigrant parent and one U.S.-born parent – are numerically significant, little research has sought to understand these families in the broader context of immigrant assimilation. Studies have shown that the academic outcomes of the 2.5 generation – the children of mixed-nativity parents – differ from both their second and third generation peers but have neglected factors that may shape such outcomes, such as home life and school ties. Using nationally representative data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002), we address empirical and theoretical gaps by comparing the home parenting behaviors and social integration outside the home of mixed-nativity families to those of two-immigrant and native families. Among mixed-nativity families, we further distinguish between those with immigrant mothers and those with immigrant fathers. Findings from our study suggest that the assimilation process of families with immigrant parents varies depending on the domain examined and the gender of the immigrant parent. In the home domain, families in which only one parent is an immigrant generally look no different from native families in their parenting behaviors. However, we find that two-immigrant parents and immigrant mothers have fewer social ties and less social capital than native parents. These findings have implications for how researchers measure and conceptualize immigrant assimilation.

Culture & Interaction: Isaac Martin, Professor of Sociology, University of California, San Diego

"Public Policy as a Cultural Object"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, September 11, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

*Time Changed* Race, Ethnicity & Immigration: Charlene Cruz-Cerdas

"Underpaid and Over Their Heads in Debt: Latina/o and Black Millennials' Labor Market Experiences"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, November 7, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Urban Ethnography Workshop: Gary Alan Fine, John Evans Professor of Sociology, Northwestern University

“Sticky Cultures: Memory Publics and Communal Pasts in Competitive Chess."
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, April 10, 2015 - 2:00pm - 3:30pm

Sticky Cultures: Memory Publics and Communal Pasts in Competitive Chess

In a departure from previous workshop meetings, participants will be expected to read “Sticky Cultures: Memory Publics and Communal Pasts in Competitive Chess,” Prof. Fine’s published Cultural Sociology article based on his ethnographic field research on competitive chess players, prior to the workshop. The additional (optional) article, “Time to Play,” is also based on his fieldwork on competitive chess. 

Expected Reading:
"Sticky Cultures: Memory Publics and Communal Pasts in Competitive Chess"
Optional Reading:
"Time to Play"


Gary Alan Fine received his B.A. in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania, and his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Harvard University. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, Russell Sage Foundation, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and currently the Institute for Advanced Study. He is the author of numerous works of ethnography, including Shared Fantasy: Role-Playing Games as Social Worlds, With the Boys: Little League Baseball and Preadolescent Culture, Kitchens: The Culture of Restaurant Work, Everyday Genius: Self-Taught Art and the Politics of Authenticity, and Authors of the Storm: Meteorology and the Culture of Prediction. His forthcoming book, Players and Pawns: How Chess Builds Community and Culture, will be published later this year by the University of Chicago Press.  

 

Education & Inequality: Rand Quinn, Assistant Professor, Penn Graduate School of Education

“Power Beyond the Purse: Private Philanthropy and the emergence of the Charter Management Organization”
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, April 24, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Studies examining the role of private philanthropy in advancing social change have primarily focused on the impact of foundations’ financial resources. Few scholars have analyzed how foundations also leverage social mechanisms to advance and legitimate desired change. We apply insights from recent scholarship on ideas as mechanisms for change to analyze the early diffusion of the charter management organization (CMO), a recent reform effort in the charter school movement. We argue that the CMO form benefited from and was advanced by widely held ideas underscoring the importance of scale. Understood and framed as the vehicle for getting to scale, the CMO form drew a disproportionate share of private philanthropy dollars, appealed to a new class of professionals from outside of education, and was successfully distinguished from alternative charter forms, all of which contributed to its early diffusion. In addition to developing a fuller understanding of the charter school movement, the paper contributes to broader scholarship on the ideational mechanisms of education reform.