Workshop

Urban Ethnography: Jeffrey F. Lane, Assistant Professor of Communication, Rutgers University

"The Digital Street"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, October 3, 2014 - 2:00pm - 3:30pm

This talk introduces the digital street, the mediated communication that structures street life. Based on the networked lives of teenagers and adults in Harlem, I describe some of the features and conditions of the digital street. My objective is to approach the street as the community itself does--through layers of digital information and interaction as well as through observations and encounters in person. Compared to earlier generations, today’s inner-city teens experience their neighborhoods differently because they are linked to each other online and are around one another—and the adults looking for them—at different and shifting digital and physical proximities. I elaborate on key transformations in the social life of the street, treating mediated communication as both a vector of neighborhood change and as an ethnographic lens.

Jeffrey Lane is an urban ethnographer who writes about the ways in which mediated communication and community come together in the life of the inner city. His research integrates face-to-face and digital fieldwork to understand how interpersonal relations and ties between people and institutions unfold over time. The Digital Street is the title and subject of his forthcoming book with Oxford University Press on the networked communication that brokers street life. The project draws on nearly five years of ethnographic research on- and offline in Harlem with a set of teenagers and the adults concerned about them. Professor Lane previously wrote a book called Under the Boards (University of Nebraska Press) on the production of race, masculinity, and popular culture in the basketball industry. Before joining the faculty at the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers University, he received his PhD in Sociology from Princeton University and was a fellow of the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation. Professor Lane, whose research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, is currently a Junior Fellow of the Yale Urban Ethnography Project. This fall at Rutgers, he teaches Mediated Communication in Society.

Education & Inequality: Hyunjoon Park (Penn) and Kuentae Kim, Associate Professor, Dept. of Korean History, Seoul National Univ.

"The Legacy of Disadvantaged Origins: Blocked Social Mobility of Descendants of Nobis (Slaves) in Late Joseon (Korea, 19th Century)"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, September 19, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Culture & Interaction: Junhow Wei

“Emotional Display in Cultural Production: The Case of Casting for Reality Television”
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, September 12, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Abstract:  How do cultural industry workers make creative decisions?  Although previous scholars have argued that decisions are shaped by organizational and institutional contexts of production, few have systematically analyzed the micro-interactional dynamics around decision-making processes.  Based on ten months of ethnographic fieldwork in the casting department of a reality television production company, I analyze how workers identify talent for new reality television programs.  Specifically, I describe how workers dramatize their evaluation of cultural objects, in this case reality television characters, through two forms of emotional expression: in situ reactions and performative storytelling.  These forms of emotional expression establish and affirm shared standards of aesthetic quality.

Family and Gender: Herb Smith, Professor of Sociology, Director of Population Studies Center, Penn

"Organizational Meeting: Meet, Greet, Share"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, September 5, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

ASA Practice Talks

Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Thursday, July 31, 2014 - 12:00pm - 2:05pm

Race, Ethnicity & Immigration: Eunbi Kim, Ph.D Student, University of Pennsylvania

"Being Sandwiched: Korean Immigrants’ Labor Experiences at Korean Transnational Corporations in the U.S."
Location: 
McNeil Building 169
Date: 
Friday, April 18, 2014 - 2:00pm - 3:30pm

 

Workshop - Elizabeth Armstrong, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Michigan

"A Workshop on Conducting Cultural Sociology with Elizabeth Armstrong from the University of Michigan"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, April 4, 2014 - 12:00pm - 2:00pm

 

Urban Ethnography: Amada Armenta, Assistant Professor, Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

"The Deportation Machine: Policing, Color Blind Racism, and the Institutional Production of Immigrant Criminality in Nashville, TN"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, April 11, 2014 - 2:00pm - 3:30pm

Abstract:

Changes to immigration enforcement policies and tactics have resulted in the expansion of deportation in the United States. However, little is known about the institutional dynamics and everyday enforcement practices that channel immigrants into the criminal justice system. Drawing on two years of fieldwork in Nashville, this article offers an on the ground account of police behavior, the first actors connecting immigrants to the criminal justice system. Building on theories of institutional and color-blind racism, I identify a system of “institutional nativism”—a set of policies and practices that work together to systematically detect, subordinate and expel noncitizens. I identify three mechanisms through which the unauthorized accrue additional disadvantage related to their alienage: 1) the local police department’s mandate that officers create contact with residents via traffic enforcement, inevitably puts offers in contact with immigrants, some of whom are unauthorized, 2) state laws prohibit unauthorized residents from obtaining driver’s licenses and identification cards, increasing their risk of arrest by local police, and 3) immigration screenings at the local jail. Local police are largely blind to their participation in deportation and explain their behavior through a color-blind ideology. This color-blind ideology obscures and naturalizes how organizational practices and laws converge to systematically criminalize unauthorized Latino residents.

 

From Amada Armenta's bio on the Penn Sociology website: 

"My research examines how the policies and practices of local law enforcement agencies in Nashville, Tennessee intersect with federal deportation policy. Relying on interviews and ethnographic observations with members of the police and sheriff’s department, and immigration advocacy groups, my work demonstrates how mundane decisions made by street-level bureaucrats can result in deportation for unauthorized migrants. More broadly, I seek to understand how government bureaucracies respond to the presence of Latino immigrants, and conversely, how Latino immigrants adapt to life in the U.S."

Race, Ethnicity & Immigration: Veronica Terriquez, Assistant Professor, University of Southern California

"Out of the Shadows and Out of the Closet: Queer Youth Leadership in the Immigrant Rights Movement"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, April 4, 2014 - 2:00pm - 3:30pm

Abstract:

LGBTQ immigrant youth have become prominent activists in the efforts to pass the DREAM (Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors) Act.  In accounting for LGBTQ (Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Queer) visibility and representation in the youth branch of the U.S. immigrant rights movement, this study contributes to research on coming out, social movements, and intersectionality.  Empirical analyses draw on data from 410 survey and 50 semi-structured interviews collected in 2011-12 from DREAM activists in California. Findings indicate that LGBTQ youth comprised a significant proportion of movement activists and that they exhibited high levels of activism—even though they encountered multiple challenges to coming out as sexual minorities within their families and communities.  As such, LGBTQ representation and visibility within the movement can largely be attributed to the internal dynamics of the movement, as well as to the politicized identities of individual activists. Specifically, DREAM organizations fostered an ethic of tolerance towards sexual minorities through activities that aimed to combat homophobia.  Additionally, DREAMers' "coming out of the shadows" strategy, borrowed from the gay rights movement, increased the ranks of Latino and Asian-Pacific Islander LGBTQ-identified youth among movement participants.  This case of social movement spillover not only empowered young people to publicly disclose their legal status, it also enabled them to declare a stigmatized sexual identity.  Finally, as politicized young people who embodied various marginalized identities, undocumented LGBTQ youths' experience with multiple forms of oppression intensified their activism.  LGBTQ DREAMers' intersectional consciousness motivated them to actively and simultaneously contest different types of oppressions through their involvement in the immigrant rights movement.
 



Veronica Terriquez received her Ph.D. in sociology from UCLA. Her research focuses on educational inequality, immigrant integration, and organized labor. Her work is linked to education justice and immigrant rights organizing efforts in California. Dr. Terriquez has also worked as a community organizer on school reform and other grassroots campaigns.

Veronica Terriquez is currently working on a study of parental engagement in Los Angeles County. Drawing on survey and semi-structured interviews data, she seeks to understand how individual parents acquire the confidence, cultural capital, and problem-solving skills to actively participate in school affairs. She is particularly interested in examining how labor and community organizations support various forms of school-based civic participation among Latino immigrants and other racially diverse parents. Dr. Terriquez is also the principal investigator of the California Young Adult Study (CYAS), a mixed-methods investigation of youths' access to postsecondary education, employment, and civic engagement opportunities.

Education & Inequality: Dana Burde, Assistant Professor, NYU Steinhardt School of Education

"Schools Without Stones: Closing the Gender Gap through Community-Based Education in Afghanistan"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, March 28, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Abstract:
This talk presents key findings from a field experiment assessing the effect of community-based schools on children’s academic performance and it describes the structure and planning of a follow up study that examines the sustainability of these schools. With a sample of 31 villages and 1,490 children in rural northwestern Afghanistan, we show that the program significantly increases enrollment and test scores among all children, but particularly for girls. Girls’ enrollment increases by 52 percentage points and their average test scores increase by 0.65 standard deviations. The effect is large enough that it eliminates the gender gap in enrollment in remote Afghan villages and dramatically reduces differences in test scores. Boys’ enrollment increases by 35 percentage points, and average test scores increase by 0.40 standard deviations. The dramatic success of these schools has led to a commitment among governments—Afghan, Canadian, Danish, and US—to support additional research to understand how to maintain these gains over time. This talk will provide up to the minute reporting on the challenges researchers face conducting rigorous research in conflict-affected environments. 
 



From her NYU Bio Page:

"My research and teaching focus on humanitarianism, education, human rights, and political violence in countries and regions affected by conflict. In this context I examine how nonstate actors and transnational networks challenge and change norms and institutions.

This research agenda is currently dominated by my work on education in emergencies, or education as an element of humanitarian action. Providing education services during humanitarian crises and early reconstruction is emerging as a key element in humanitarian action. Humanitarian agencies view education as a way to protect children from violence, promote child welfare, and enhance stability in communities recovering from violent conflict.  Indeed, promoting education programs is no longer only a charitable endeavor; many consider it essential to promoting security (e.g., United States Agency for International Development, World Bank). This increased attention to education in relief work is reflected in the rising numbers of programs and the expanded role for education policies in post-conflict state building.

To contribute evidence-based research in this field, I launched a multi-year study to assess the impact of community-based education services delivered to civilian populations affected by war in Afghanistan. The most recent iteration of this project, which I conducted with Leigh Linden in Columbia University’s Department of Economics, examined the impact of educational services on children’s enrollment and achievement. In 2006, the U.S. government directed $24 million to a community-based schools program—Partnership for Advancing Community Education in Afghanistan. Comprised of four non-profits—CARE, International Rescue Committee, Agha Khan Foundation, and Catholic Relief Services (CRS)—the program fostered thousands of community-based schools across 19 provinces in Afghanistan. Taking advantage of an unusual opportunity to implement a rigorous research design in an early reconstruction context, we formed a partnership with the US-based nongovernmental organization CRS to implement random assignment of schools and program interventions to eligible villages.

With a sample of 31 villages and approximately 1,500 children between the ages of 6 and 11 in northwest Afghanistan, we randomly assigned 13 villages to receive community-based schools one year before the schools were supplied to the entire sample. This time delay allowed us to estimate the one-year impact of the schools on girls’ and boys’ attendance and knowledge of math and the local language, Dari. We found that community-based schools have a dramatic effect on children’s academic participation and performance and have tremendous potential for reducing existing gender disparities in rural areas in Afghanistan. Children are almost 50 percentage points more likely to attend school if a community-based school is available to them. Most importantly, the rate of girls’ attendance increases 15 percentage points more than their male counterparts. After one year of first grade classes these schools virtually eliminate differences in enrollment and significantly reduce the existing achievement gap between boys and girls.

The first phase of this project collected data on the cognitive skills, individual attributes, and experiences of adolescents aged 12-14 who were either enrolled in a government school, a school supported by a nongovernmental organization, a Qur’anic school, or who were unenrolled. Four findings are important in relation to the original hypothesis in the study: (1) attitudes toward education, (2) level of fear in children’s lives, (3) educational outcomes, and (4) influence of communitarian values on children’s attitudes and behaviors. For more information on this stage of the project, see the report here

Since its inception, this study has received approximately $750,000 from foundations including the National Science Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the United States Institute of Peace and the Weikart Family Foundation. Institutes like Columbia University’s Institute for Economic Research and Policy and the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies were instrumental in the first phase of this study."