Standing Faculty

Guobin Yang, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Sociology and Communication

Education: 

Ph.D., Sociology, New York University, 2002
Ph.D., English Literature, Beijing Foreign Studies University, 1993

Curriculum Vitae

Research Areas: 

Social Movements
Online Activism and Internet Studies
Cultural Sociology
Media Sociology
Collective Memory
Curriculum Vitae

 

 

Research Description: 

Guobin Yang is an Associate Professor of Communication and Sociology in the Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. His research areas cover digital media, political communication, global communication, social movements, cultural sociology, and the sociology of China.

Yang's books include The Power of the Internet in China: Citizen Activism Online (Columbia University Press, 2009. Winner of best book award, Communication and Information Technologies Section of the American Sociological Association, 2010),  Re-Envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China (edited with Ching-Kwan Lee, 2007), China's Red Guard Generation: Loyalty, Dissent, and Nostalgia, 1966-1999 (under contract, Columbia University Press), and Dragon-Carving and the Literary Mind (2 volumes. Library of Chinese Classics in English Translation, Beijing, 2003). 

Yang is a member of the editorial boards of The China Quarterly, Public Culture, Contemporary Sociology, and the International Convention for Asian Studies Publications Series of the Amsterdam University Press. He received a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation “Writing and Research Grant” (2003) and was a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington , D.C. (2003-2004). Previously he taught as an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and as an associate professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures at Barnard College of Columbia University. He has a Ph. D. in English Literature with a specialty in Literary Translation from Beijing Foreign Studies University (1993) and a second Ph.D. in Sociology from New York University (2000).

Contact Information: 

Office: 394 McNeil Building
Email: gyang@asc.upenn.edu

Dorothy Roberts, J.D.

George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology and the Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights

Director, Program on Race, Science and Society

Education: 

J.D., Harvard Law School, 1980
B.A. Yale College, 1977

Curriculum Vitae

Research Areas: 

Gender and Race
Family
Criminal Justice
Bioethics
Sociology of Science
Curriculum Vitae

Research Description: 

Dorothy Roberts, an acclaimed scholar of race, gender and the law, joined the University of Pennsylvania as its 14th Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor with a joint appointment in the Department of Sociology and the Law School where she also holds the inaugural Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mosell Alexander chair. Her pathbreaking work in law and public policy focuses on urgent contemporary issues in health, social justice, and bioethics, especially as they impact the lives of women, children and African-Americans. Her major books include Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-first Century (New Press, 2011); Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare (Basic Books, 2002), and Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty (Pantheon, 1997). She is the author of more than 80 scholarly articles and book chapters, as well as a co-editor of six books on such topics as constitutional law and women and the law.

Contact Information: 

Office: 361 McNeil Building
Email: dorothyroberts@law.upenn.edu

Onoso Imoagene, Ph.D.

 Assistant Professor of Sociology

Education: 

Ph.D., Sociology, Harvard University, 2011
M.A. Sociology, Harvard University, 2008
M.Phil. Modern Society and Global Transformations, Cambridge University, 2002
B.Sc., Sociology, University of Ibadan, 1999

Curriculum Vitae

Research Areas: 

Immigration
Inter-ethnic group relations
The African Second generation in the U.S. and U.K
Race and Ethnicity
Immigrant educational attainment and social mobility
Curriculum Vitae

Research Description: 

My current research focuses on the adult African second generation in the U.S. and U.K. Given the somewhat poor group status of African Americans in the U.S and Caribbeans in the U.K, I am interested in investigating how this recent (new black) group are negotiating being black and race meanings, how national context affect their ethnic identification, buy-in to national identity and national myths, and relations with longer-established black groups. I am also interested in investigating the extent to which their social outcomes bring into question the predictions of segmented assimilation theory.  I am currently working on producing a book from this project. My other research focuses on educational attainment and social mobility among immigrants. More broadly, I seek to understand what the experiences of the African second generation reveal about race and racism and the intersections of race, class, culture, and gender in the U.S. and U.K. I will be teaching courses on sociology of immigration and African societies in 2013.

Contact Information: 

Office: 291 McNeil Building
Phone: 215-898-4428
Emailimoagene@sas.upenn.edu

Amada Armenta, Ph.D.

 Assistant Professor of Sociology

Education: 

Ph.D Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, 2011
M.A. Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, 2006
B.A. Political Science, Rice University, 2004

Curriculum Vitae

Research Areas: 

Immigration
Bureaucracy and institutions
Race/Ethnicity
Latinos in the U.S.
Curriculum Vitae  

Research Description: 

My research examines how the policies and practices of local law enforcement agencies in Nashville, Tennessee intersect with federal deportation policy. Relying on interviews and ethnographic observations with members of the police and sheriff’s department, and immigration advocacy groups, my work demonstrates how mundane decisions made by street-level bureaucrats can result in deportation for unauthorized migrants. More broadly, I seek to understand how government bureaucracies respond to the presence of Latino immigrants, and conversely, how Latino immigrants adapt to life in the U.S.

 

Contact Information: 

Office: 228 McNeil Building
Phone: 215.898.9980
E-mail: armenta@sas.upenn.edu

Tukufu Zuberi, Ph.D.

Professor of Sociology 
The Lasry Family Professor of Race Relations
Professor of Africana Studies

Education: 

Ph.D. Sociology, University of Chicago, 1989
M.A. Sociology, California State University, Sacramento, 1985
B.A. Sociology, San Jose State University, 1981

Curriculum Vitae

Research Areas: 

Sociology
Population Studies
Africana Studies
Filmmaking
Curriculum Vitae

Research Description: 

Dr. Tukufu Zuberi is the Lasry Family Professor of Race Relations, and Professor of Sociology and Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He is dedicated to bringing a fresh view of culture and society to the public through various platforms such as guest lecturing at universities, television programs, and interactive social media. Currently, he works on human rights initiatives by participating in public speaking engagements, international collaborations with transnational organizations, and individuals dedicated to human equality. 

Dr. Zuberi’s research focuses on Race, African and African Diaspora populations. He has been a visiting professor at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda and the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania. He currently serves as the Chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. He has also served as the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography, the Director of the African Studies Program, and the Director of the Afro-American Studies Program. In 2002, he became the founding Director of the Center for Africana Studies, and he has also served as the Faculty Associate Director of the Center for Africana Studies.

Dr. Zuberi is the writer and producer for African Independence, an award-winning feature-length documentary film that highlights the birth, realization, and problems confronted by the movement to win independence in Africa. The story is told by channeling the voices of freedom fighters and leaders who achieved independence, liberty and justice for African people. With this and other documentary film projects, Dr. Zuberi is dedicated to bringing a critical, creative vision not typically seen or heard on the big and small screen

Born Antonio McDaniel to Willie and Annie McDaniel, and raised in the housing projects of Oakland, California in the 1970s, he embraced the name Tukufu Zuberi - Swahili for "beyond praise" and "strength." He “took the name because of a desire to make and have a connection with an important period where people were challenging what it means to be a human being."

For more information on his current and past projects, please check out www.tukufuzuberi.com and www.african-independence.com.

Current Projects:

- African Independence (documentary)
- Black Bodies in Propaganda: The Art of the War Poster
- Tides of Freedom: African Presence on the Delaware River

Contact Information: 

Office: 246 McNeil Building
Phone: 215.573.5169
E-mail: tukufu@pop.upenn.edu

Michel Guillot, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Sociology

Education: 

Ph.D., Demography and Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, 2000
M.A., Demography, Institut de Démographie de l’Université de Paris I-Sorbonne, 1996
B.A., History, Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne, 1992

Curriculum Vitae

Research Areas: 

Social and Formal Demography
Medical Sociology
Health of Populations
Curriculum Vitae

Research Description: 

Michel Guillot’s research focuses on mortality and formal demography. During the past three years, he has completed work on tempo effects in mortality, demographic measurement, and mortality dynamics in developing countries, in particular in former Soviet Central Asia. In the area of demographic measurement, Guillot has proposed a new approach for estimating health expectancies in the absence of longitudinal data. In his work in former Soviet Central Asia, Guillot finds that adult mortality in Kyrgyzstan is lower than in Russia (a much richer country), in part because of cultural differences related to alcohol consumption. More generally, he finds important differences in the nature of the post-Soviet health crisis in Central Asia and Russia. These findings have health policy implications in countries of the former USSR.

Contact Information: 

Office: 291 McNeil Building
Phone: 215.573.3655
Email: miguillo@sas.upenn.edu

Melissa Wilde, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Sociology

Education: 

Ph.D. Sociology, University of California, Berkeley, 2002
M.A. Sociology, University of California, Berkeley, 1998
B.A. Sociology, New York University, 1996

Curriculum Vitae

Research Areas: 

Sociology of Religion
Social Movements
Culture
Curriculum Vitae

Research Description: 

One overarching question has driven my research as a comparative-historical cultural sociologist: How can we better understand the ways in which religious institutions, as belief systems developed centuries or millennia ago, react to cultural change? In pursuit of this question, I have investigated a variety of religious changes including: the cultural factors and social movements that directed the Second Vatican Council in the Roman Catholic Church (1962-65); the demographic factors that explain why American Protestantism has gone from being majority Mainline to majority conservative and evangelical; and the role religious competition and marketing played in encouraging the Roman Catholic Church to exponentially increase its granting of marital annulments.

Currently, I am investigating how we as a nation arrived at a juncture where the politics of sex and gender are the key issue dividing American religious groups, the central battle in what many have referred to as the “culture wars." To do so, I examine the 31 largest American religious groups’ stances on birth control, abortion, divorce, women’s ordination and homosexuality over the course of the Twentieth Century. I have found that contemporary divisions are rooted in inequalities of race and class, because those groups who first liberalized on issues of sex did so in relation to the issue of birth control in the early 1930s; and their stances on birth control were determined by their particular class and racial locations.

Contact Information: 

Office: 292 McNeil Building
Phone: 215.898.4258
E-mail: mwilde@sas.upenn.edu

Hyunjoon Park, Ph.D.

Korea Foundation Associate Professor of Sociology and Education

Education: 

Ph.D., Sociology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2005
M.S., Population Health Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2003
M.A., Sociology, Sungkyunkwan University, 1997
B.A.Sungkyunkwan University

Curriculum Vitae

Research Areas: 

Education
Social Stratification
Family
Social Demography
Social Change in Korea and other East Asian countries
Curriculum Vitae

Research Description: 

CONTEXTS MATTER: HOW DO SCHOOLS AND FAMILIES AFFECT CHILDREN’S EDUCATION? In contemporary societies, schools and families are two social institutions that are most relevant for children’s education. However, the ways in which schools and families affect children’s education are contingent upon contexts of institutional arrangements of educational systems, public policy, and demographic changes. Using large-scale international data of academic achievement (PISA) that involves more than 40 countries, I have shown considerable cross-national variation in the degree and pattern of the impacts of school and family factors on children’s academic performance. My work shows how educational stratification at the individual and school levels is mediated by national contexts of structural features of educational systems such as differentiation and standardization, and state involvement in family welfare. My recent work examines how schooling environments shape students’ educational outcomes by exploring potential benefits of single-sex schooling among high school students in South Korea. An important feature of Korean education is the random assignment of students into single-sex schools and coeducational schools, which offers an excellent opportunity for assessing causal effects of single-sex schooling. By utilizing longitudinal data that have traced educational careers beyond high school, this research investigates not only short-term effects of single-sex schooling on achievement and socioemotional indicators but also long-term effects on transition to higher education. Another contextual factor that has important implications for children’s education and well-being is family change. I am interested in consequences of rapid family changes for children’s well-being in societies which have weak public welfare systems and conservative family norms, and therefore where family changes should have particularly important implications for children. In this line of research, I examine the implications of recent family changes in South Korea, represented by rapid growth in divorce and international marriages, for children’s education and well-being.

Contact Information: 

Office: 219 McNeil Building
Phone: 215.898.0942
E-mail: hypark@sas.upenn.edu

Janice F. Madden, Ph.D.

Professor of Regional Science, Sociology, Urban Studies, and Real Estate
Associate Chair, Department of Sociology

Education: 

Ph.D., Economics, Duke University, 1972
M.A., Economics, Duke University, 1971
B.A., Economics, University of Denver, 1969

Curriculum Vitae

Research Areas: 

Urban and Regional Economics
Labor Markets
Demography
Gender and Race
Curriculum Vitae

Research Description: 

My research deals with the influence of demographics and/or spatial structure on the workings of the labor market, concentrating on the study of discrimination and of spatial immobility in the labor market. My research can be grouped into the following topics: (1) the influence of discrimination and of government policies to eliminate discrimination on labor market outcomes; (2) the extent and effects of spatial immobility in local labor markets; and (3) differences in growth in income and earnings inequality in American cities.

Discrimination

I have developed a theory of sex discrimination in the labor market assuming that women face an imperfectly competitive labor market. I have used a variety of national data sets to quantify the extent of discrimination in the labor market. I have argued that co-worker discrimination makes women and members of minority groups less effective workers in a variety of jobs requiring team, rather than individual, efforts.  In recent papers, I have analyzed the effects of the National Football League’s policies on the racial composition of its coaching staff.

Spatial Immobility

I have studied geographic immobility within urban labor markets--i.e., differences arising from commuting and access to residential locales. My work in this area simultaneously considers both commuting and residential mobility as necessary to the study of intrametropolitan mobility. I have developed several related models of household location decision making and empirically estimated the effects of location on employment and of employment on location in a variety of situations.

Inequality within Metropolitan Areas

I have measured income distribution, poverty and poverty concentration changes within metropolitan areas, finding that household formation patterns are important contributors to the distribution of household income. While local labor market conditions have greater effects, the demographic structure is almost as important, and explains a substantial proportion of the variation across metropolitan areas in income inequality.  I have examined the spatial concentration of poverty and income in the suburbs of large American cities finding little evidence of a growing spatial concentration of income or poverty among suburbs, certainly not of the magnitude that has occurred in the central city relative to the suburbs.  In recent papers, I have analyzed connections between segregation by income and segregation by race in America’s large metro areas.

In addition, I am currently working on:

·         Sources of gender differentials in compensation among stockbrokers. 

·         Explanations for the narrower gender wage gap among gays and lesbians than among heterosexuals. 

 

Contact Information: 

Office: 365 McNeil Building
Phone: 215.898.6739
E-mail: madden@ssc.sas.upenn.edu

Jerry A. Jacobs, Ph.D.

Professor of Sociology

Education: 

Ph.D., Sociology, Harvard University, 1983
A.B. Sociology, Harvard University, 1977

Currculum Vitae

Personal Web Page

Research Areas: 

Working Time and Work-Family Conflict Work
Gender and Education
Gender and Careers
Interdisciplinarity
Currculum Vitae

Research Description: 

Jerry A. Jacobs has been a member of the faculty in sociology at Penn since 1983, when he completed his Ph.D. in sociology at Harvard. He has served as the Editor of the American Sociological Review and is the Founding President of the Work and Family Researchers Network. His research has addressed a number of aspects of women's employment, including authority, earnings, working conditions, part-time work and work-family conflict, and entry into male-dominated occupations. He has authored or edited 10 books and journal special issues, published 75 academic papers and received more than 30 research grants. His books include The Changing Face of Medicine, with Ann Boulis, (Cornell University Press, 2008), The Time Divide, with Kathleen Gerson (Harvard University Press, 2004), and Revolving Doors: Sex Segregation and Women's Careers (Stanford University Press, 1989). Jacobs’ study of interdisciplinary scholarly communication, In Defense of Disciplines: Interdisciplinarity, Specialization and the Research University, was recently published by the University of Chicago Press.

Contact Information: 

Office: 217 McNeil Building
Phone: 215.898.1536
Email: jjacobs@sas.upenn.edu