Emeritus and Other Professors

Elijah Anderson, Ph.D.

William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology, Yale Unversity
Charles and William L. Day Distinguished Professor of the Social Sciences, Emeritus Professor Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

Research Areas: 

Social Organization
The Urban Underclass
Interactional Social Psychology
Race Relations
Qualitative Methods

Research Description: 

Elijah Anderson holds the William K. Lanman Professorship at Yale University, where he teaches and directs the Urban Ethnography Project.  Anderson is one of the nation’s leading urban ethnographers and cultural theorists.  He received his B.A. from Indiana University, his M.A. from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. from Northwestern University, where he was mentored by Howard S. Becker.

Before joining the Yale faculty in July 2007, Anderson served for many years as the Charles and William L. Day Distinguished Professor and Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, with a secondary appointment in the Wharton School.

Previously, he worked as an assistant professor of Sociology at Swarthmore College (1973–1975); in 1975, he joined the Penn faculty. At the University of Pennsylvania, he rose to associate professor in 1981, and to full professor in 1988; he was appointed to the Max and Heidi Berry Term Chair in 1989, to the Charles and William L. Day Professorship in 1991, and then to Distinguished Professor in 2001.  He has also served as Visiting Professor at Swarthmore College, Princeton University and Ecole des Etudes Hautes en Science Sociales in Paris, France.

Anderson has written and edited numerous books, book chapters, articles, and scholarly reports on race in American cities. His most prominent works include the classic sociological work, A Place on the Corner; Streetwise: Race, Class, and Change in an Urban Community (1990), winner of the American Sociological Association’s Robert E. Park Award for the best published book in the area of Urban Sociology; and Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City (1999), winner of the 2000 Komarovsky Award from the Eastern Sociological Society.  In 2008, he edited Against the Wall: Poor, Young, Black, and Male (Penn Press), which is based on a national conference, “Poor, Young, Black, and Male: A Case for National Action?” which he organized at the University of Pennsylvania in 2006. His most recent work is:  The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life (forthcoming 2011, Norton). ta>

In addition, Anderson has won the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching at the University of Pennsylvania; and he was named the Robin M. Williams, Jr., Distinguished Lecturer for 1999-2000 by the Eastern Sociological Society. In 2006, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree from Northwestern University. Anderson has served on the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Political and Social Science and is past vice-president of the American Sociological Association. He has served in an editorial capacity for a wide range of professional journals and special publications in his field, including Qualitative Sociology, Ethnography, American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, City & Community, Annals of the Society of Political and Social Science, and the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research. He has also served as a consultant to a variety of government agencies, including the White House, the United States Congress, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Science Foundation.  And, he has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Panel on the Understanding and Control of Violent Behavior.

Contact Information: 

Yale University
140 Prospect Street
New Haven CT 06520

Telephone: 203.432.3321
Fax: 203.432.5092

Email: elijah.anderson@yale.edu

Samuel Klausner, Ph.D.

EmeritusProfessor of Sociology
Emeritus Professor of Sociology Associate, Middle East Center

Research Areas: 

Sociology of Religion
Sociological Theory
International Law and Relations
Historical Sociology
Sociology of Culture
Middle Eastern Studies

Research Description: 

I have continued the lines of research in the Sociology of Religion and in Methodology-Philosophy of Science. Currently my long range project is a comparison of Hebrew and Muslim dietary systems as a window to their theological presuppositions. I am completing a methodological critique of wissenschaft Bible scholar’s work on interpreting a verse in the Books of exodus and Deuteronomy. That is to say, I am applying sociological thought to the clarification of classic documents.

 

Brief CV

Full CV

Contact Information: 

Diana Crane-Herve, Ph.D.

Emeritus Professor Sociology

Research Areas: 

History and sociology of the arts
The news and entertainment media
Fashion in clothing and other material goods

Research Description: 

Diana Crane is professor emerita of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her book, Transformation of the Avant Garde - discusses the rise of Abstract Expressionism, when New York City became the acknowledged center of the avant-garde. Diana Crane documents the transformation of the New York art world between 1940 and 1985, both in the artistic styles that emerged during this period and the expansion of the number and types of institutions that purchased and displayed various works.

In her most recent book, Fashion and Its Social Agendas: Class, Gender, and Identity in Clothing, Dr. Crane compares nineteenth-century societies France and the United States where social class was the most salient aspect of social identity signified in clothing with late twentieth-century America, where lifestyle, gender, sexual orientation, age, and ethnicity are more meaningful to individuals in constructing their wardrobes. Today, clothes worn at work signify social class, but leisure clothes convey meanings ranging from trite to political. In today's multicode societies, clothes inhibit as well as facilitate communication between highly fragmented social groups. She extends her comparison by showing how nineteenth-century French designers created fashions that suited lifestyles of Paris elites but that were also widely adopted outside France. By contrast, today's designers operate in a global marketplace, shaped by television, film, and popular music. No longer confined to elites, trendsetters are drawn from many social groups, and most trends have short trajectories. To assess the impact of fashion on women, Professor Crane uses voices of college-aged and middle-aged women who took part in focus groups. These discussions yield fascinating information about women's perceptions of female identity and sexuality in the fashion industry.

Contact Information: 

 

Renee C. Fox, Ph.D.

Professor Emerita, Sociology
Annenberg Professor Emerita of the Social Sciences

Education: 

Ph.D., Sociology, Radcliffe College, Harvard University, 1954
B.A., Smith College, 1949

Research Areas: 

Sociology of medicine
Medical research
Medical education
Medical ethics
Medical humanitarianism

 

Research Description: 

Renée C. Fox, a summa cum laude graduate of Smith College in 1949, earned her Ph.D. in Sociology in 1954 from Radcliffe College, Harvard University, where she studied in the Department of Social Relations.

Before joining the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania in 1969, she was a member of the Columbia University Bureau of Applied Social Research, taught for twelve years at Barnard College, and then spent two years as a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Social Relations at Harvard. At the University of Pennsylvania, she was a professor in the Department of Sociology with joint, secondary appointments in the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, and in the School of Nursing; and she held an interdisciplinary chair as the Annenberg Professor of the Social Sciences. From 1972-1978 she was the Chair of the Penn Sociology Department. On July 1, 1998, she became the Annenberg Professor Emerita of the Social Sciences. She is also an Emerita Senior Fellow of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania.

Renée Fox’s major teaching and research interests – sociology of medicine, medical research, medical education, and medical ethics – have involved her in first-hand, participant observation-based studies in Continental Europe (particularly in Belgium), in Central Africa (especially in the Democratic Republic of Congo), and in the People’s Republic of China, as well as in the United States. She has lectured in colleges, universities, and medical schools throughout the United States, and has taught in a number of universities abroad. During the 1996-1997 academic year, she was the George Eastman Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford.

Her books include: Experiment Perilous: Physicians and Patients Facing the Unknown; The Sociology of Medicine: A Participant Observer’s View; Essays in Medical Sociology; In the Belgian Château: The Spirit and Culture of a European Society in an Age of Change; In the Field: A Sociologist’s Journey, and (in co-authorship with Judith P.Swazey), The Courage to Fail: A Social View of Organ Transplants and Dialysis, Spare Parts: Organ Replacement in American Society, and Observing Bioethics.

Fox is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an Honorary Member of Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. She is the holder of a Radcliffe Graduate School Medal, and of a Centennial Medal from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University, and is a recipient of the American Sociological Association’s Leo G. Reeder Award for Distinguished Contributions to Medical Sociology. She has received several teaching awards: an E. Harris Harbison Gifted Teaching Award of the Danforth Foundation, and a Lindback Foundation Award for Teaching at the University of Pennsylvania. She holds eleven honorary degrees, and in 1995, the Belgian Government named her Chevalier of the Order of Leopold II. In October 2007, she was the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities.

Contact Information: 

Ivar Berg, Ph.D.

Emeritus Professor Sociology

Research Areas: 

Economic Sociology
Sociology of Work and Organizations

Research Description: 

Called "one of the seminal figures in the sociological study of the labor market and the founder of Economic Sociology," Ivar Berg’s Education and Jobs: The Great Training Robbery is a seminal book that determined how to measure productivity directly, rather than indirectly. "Berg documented an inflation of educational credentialing that bore no relation to a great many jobs requiring diplomas and degrees. His discoveries ultimately led to the emergence of modern Economic Sociology as a field of study."

Ivar Berg showed that the economists’ assumption that salary reflected productivity was wrong. At the time, college degree holders were an extremely elite group. Today we are in an era of near-universal high school completion,yet one can still end up in poverty in spite of holding a high school diploma. Demand for an educated workforce is driven primarily by the increase in the number of workers with credentials. There is also demand from students and parents because 1) education establishes social status and credibility and 2) it is an investment that will get you ahead (it is less a consumption of high culture than a means to an end). Berg showed that all this additional credentialing had no positive effect on productivity.

Contact Information: 

 

Harold J. Bershady, Ph.D.

Emeritus Professor of Sociology

Education: 

 

Research Areas: 

Sociological Theory

History of Social Thought

Sociology of Knowledge

Sociology of Culture

Psychology and Sociology

Urban and Community Sociology

Philosophy of the Social Sciences

Social Organization

Research Description: 

 

Contact Information: 

Office: 113 McNeil Building
Phone: 215.898.1538
Emailhbershad@sas.upenn.edu

Samuel Preston, Ph.D.

Professor of Sociology

Education: 

Ph.D. Economics, Princeton University, 1968
B.A., Economics, Amherst College, 1965

Curriculum Vitae

Research Areas: 

Demography
Health of populations

Research Description: 

Preston's major research interest is in the health of populations. He has written primarily about mortality trends and patterns in large aggregates, including twentieth century mortality transitions and black/white differentials in the United States. Recent research has focused on the mortality effects of cigarette smoking and obesity in developed countries. Two papers with Dana Glei and John Wlimoth use data for 21 countries for the past 60 years to demonstrate the relationship between lung cancer deaths and deaths from other causes. This relationship enables improved calculations of deaths attributable to smoking. One of these papers appears in a 2011 National Academy of Sciences publication from a committee that he co-chaired with Eileen Crimmins. The committee addressed the question of why US life expectancy lags so far behind the world's leaders. A related paper with Jessica Ho addressed the question of the effectiveness of the US health care system, relative to that of other countries, in enhancing survival. A third paper, with Andrew Stokes, estimated the impact of international variation in obesity on international differences in mortality. This paper led to a 5-year project funded by the National Institute of Aging that began in September 2011. Related work is supported by a grant from the National Bureau of Economic Research. Other recent research projects address the future of American fertility and the demographic causes of population aging.

Contact Information: 

Office: 289 McNeil Building
Phone: 215.746.5396
E-mail: spreston@falcon.sas.upenn.edu

Frank F. Furstenberg, Ph.D.

The Zellerbach Family Professor of Sociology

Research Areas: 

Family Sociology
Demography
Urban Sociology
Gender Studies
Sociology of Education
Children, Youth and Public Policy

Research Description: 

 

Contact Information: 

Office: 277 McNeil Building
Phone: 215.898.6718
Fax: 215.898.2124
Email: fff@ssc.upenn.edu

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