Friday, September 5, 2014 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Family and Gender: Herb Smith, Professor of Sociology, Director of Population Studies Center, Penn
TBD
Friday, September 12, 2014 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Culture & Interaction: Junhow Wei
“Emotional Display in Cultural Production: The Case of Casting for Reality Television”

Abstract:  How do cultural industry workers make creative decisions?  Although previous scholars have argued that decisions are shaped by organizational and institutional contexts of production, few have systematically analyzed the micro-interactional dynamics around decision-making processes.  Based on ten months of ethnographic fieldwork in the casting department of a reality television production company, I analyze how workers identify talent for new reality television programs.  Specifically, I describe how workers dramatize their evaluation of cultural objects, in this case reality television characters, through two forms of emotional expression: in situ reactions and performative storytelling.  These forms of emotional expression establish and affirm shared standards of aesthetic quality.

Friday, September 19, 2014 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Education & Inequality: Hyunjoon Park (Penn) and Kuentae Kim, Associate Professor, Dept. of Korean History, Seoul National Univ.
"The Legacy of Disadvantaged Origins: Blocked Social Mobility of Descendants of Nobis (Slaves) in Late Joseon (Korea, 19th Century)"
Friday, October 3, 2014 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Urban Ethnography: Jeffrey D. Lane, Assistant Professor of Communication, Rutgers University
TBD
Friday, October 17, 2014 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Family & Gender: Amy Steinbugler
TBD
Friday, October 24, 2014 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Culture & Interaction: Elliot B. Weininger (SUNY Brockport) and Annette Lareau
“Relying on the Network in Choosing Where to Live: The Reproduction of Residential Inequality”

Abstract: There is little doubt that the United States is characterized by very high levels of segregation by race and social class. However, much of the research on residential segregation has been geared towards describing macro-level patterns rather than the micro-level interactions through which these patterns are constituted and sustained over time.  Furthermore, to the extent that researchers have turned their attention to the study of residential decision-making, their focus has often been on explicating the choices made by poor families moving into and out of urban neighborhoods.  In this paper, drawing on in-depth interviews with about 90 white and African American families with young children, we highlight the crucial role of informal networks in the selection of where to live. While many decades of research have stressed the importance of amenities (such as schools) to families’ choices, few have asked the question of how families acquire information about the characteristics of particular neighborhoods and how they form a preference for (or an aversion to) these neighborhoods.  Our results suggest that network ties are crucial in this regard, regardless of families’ class or race: far from conducting systematic “research” on the range of options open to them—examining school performance, crime rates, consumption opportunities, housing value changes, and so forth—the majority of the families in our data were guided toward a set of neighborhoods by trusted network contacts.  These contacts could be friends, coworkers, or kin, but their influence is hard to overstate.  The consequence of this reliance on social ties was that families gravitated towards neighborhoods that reflected the composition of their networks.  Thus, we suggest that networks are one of the factors that reproduce the segregation—along lines of both class and race—of urban and suburban neighborhoods.

Friday, October 31, 2014 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Urban Ethnography: Sarah Zelner
TBD
Friday, November 7, 2014 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Race, Ethnicity & Immigration: Charlene Cruz-Cerdas
TBD
Friday, November 14, 2014 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Co-Sponsored Workshop: Education & Inequality / Race, Ethnicity & Immigration - Bo Paulle
TBD
Friday, January 16, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Family and Gender: Lindsay Wood
TBD
Friday, January 23, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Culture & Interaction: Aliya Rao
“'It’s a Job to Find a Job': Job Search as Couple’s Activity”
Friday, January 30, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Education & Inequality Workshop
TBD
Friday, February 6, 2015 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Race, Ethnicity and Immigration: Elizabeth Vaquera, Associate Professor, Sociology University of South Florida
TBD
Friday, February 13, 2015 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Urban Ethnography Workshop
TBD
Friday, February 20, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Family & Gender: Calvin Zimmerman
TBD
Friday, March 20, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Culture & Interaction: MA Thesis Panel (Presenters TBD)
Friday, March 27, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Education & Inequality: Rand Quinn, Assistant Professor, Penn Graduate School of Education
TBD
Friday, April 3, 2015 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Race, Immigration & Ethnicity: Heidy Sarabia, Penn Postdoctoral Researcher
TBD
Friday, April 10, 2015 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Urban Ethnography Workshop
TBD