Friday, October 3, 2014 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Urban Ethnography: Jeffrey F. Lane, Assistant Professor of Communication, Rutgers University
"The Digital Street"

This talk introduces the digital street, the mediated communication that structures street life. Based on the networked lives of teenagers and adults in Harlem, I describe some of the features and conditions of the digital street. My objective is to approach the street as the community itself does--through layers of digital information and interaction as well as through observations and encounters in person. Compared to earlier generations, today’s inner-city teens experience their neighborhoods differently because they are linked to each other online and are around one another—and the adults looking for them—at different and shifting digital and physical proximities. I elaborate on key transformations in the social life of the street, treating mediated communication as both a vector of neighborhood change and as an ethnographic lens.

Jeffrey Lane is an urban ethnographer who writes about the ways in which mediated communication and community come together in the life of the inner city. His research integrates face-to-face and digital fieldwork to understand how interpersonal relations and ties between people and institutions unfold over time. The Digital Street is the title and subject of his forthcoming book with Oxford University Press on the networked communication that brokers street life. The project draws on nearly five years of ethnographic research on- and offline in Harlem with a set of teenagers and the adults concerned about them. Professor Lane previously wrote a book called Under the Boards (University of Nebraska Press) on the production of race, masculinity, and popular culture in the basketball industry. Before joining the faculty at the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers University, he received his PhD in Sociology from Princeton University and was a fellow of the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation. Professor Lane, whose research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, is currently a Junior Fellow of the Yale Urban Ethnography Project. This fall at Rutgers, he teaches Mediated Communication in Society.

Friday, October 17, 2014 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Family & Gender: Amy Steinbugler, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Dickinson College
"Everyday Interraciality: Lesbian, Gay and Heterosexual Intimacies in Black and White"
Friday, October 24, 2014 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Culture & Interaction: Annette Lareau
“Relying on the Network in Choosing Where to Live: The Reproduction of Residential Inequality”

Abstract: There is little doubt that the United States is characterized by very high levels of segregation by race and social class. However, much of the research on residential segregation has been geared towards describing macro-level patterns rather than the micro-level interactions through which these patterns are constituted and sustained over time.  Furthermore, to the extent that researchers have turned their attention to the study of residential decision-making, their focus has often been on explicating the choices made by poor families moving into and out of urban neighborhoods.  In this paper, drawing on in-depth interviews with about 90 white and African American families with young children, we highlight the crucial role of informal networks in the selection of where to live. While many decades of research have stressed the importance of amenities (such as schools) to families’ choices, few have asked the question of how families acquire information about the characteristics of particular neighborhoods and how they form a preference for (or an aversion to) these neighborhoods.  Our results suggest that network ties are crucial in this regard, regardless of families’ class or race: far from conducting systematic “research” on the range of options open to them—examining school performance, crime rates, consumption opportunities, housing value changes, and so forth—the majority of the families in our data were guided toward a set of neighborhoods by trusted network contacts.  These contacts could be friends, coworkers, or kin, but their influence is hard to overstate.  The consequence of this reliance on social ties was that families gravitated towards neighborhoods that reflected the composition of their networks.  Thus, we suggest that networks are one of the factors that reproduce the segregation—along lines of both class and race—of urban and suburban neighborhoods.

Friday, October 31, 2014 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Urban Ethnography: Sarah Zelner
TBD
Friday, November 7, 2014 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Race, Ethnicity & Immigration: Charlene Cruz-Cerdas
TBD
Friday, November 14, 2014 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Co-Sponsored Workshop: Education & Inequality / Race, Ethnicity & Immigration - Bo Paulle
TBD
Friday, January 16, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Family and Gender: Lindsay Wood
TBD
Friday, January 23, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Culture & Interaction: Aliya Rao
“'It’s a Job to Find a Job': Job Search as Couple’s Activity”
Friday, January 30, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Education & Inequality Workshop
TBD
Friday, February 6, 2015 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Race, Ethnicity and Immigration: Elizabeth Vaquera, Associate Professor, Sociology University of South Florida
TBD
Friday, February 13, 2015 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Urban Ethnography Workshop
TBD
Friday, February 20, 2015 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Family & Gender: Calvin Zimmerman
TBD
Friday, March 20, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Culture & Interaction: MA Thesis Panel (Presenters TBD)
Friday, March 27, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Education & Inequality: Rand Quinn, Assistant Professor, Penn Graduate School of Education
TBD
Friday, April 3, 2015 - 12:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Race, Immigration & Ethnicity: Andrea Panchok-Berry
TBD
Friday, April 10, 2015 - 2:00pm
169 McNeil Building
Urban Ethnography Workshop
TBD