Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
SOCI 001-401 Introduction To Sociology Jerry A Jacobs MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002401 Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 001-402 Introduction To Sociology R 08:30 AM-09:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-403 Introduction To Sociology R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-404 Introduction To Sociology R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-405 Introduction To Sociology R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002405 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-406 Introduction To Sociology F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002406 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-407 Introduction To Sociology F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002407 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-601 Intro To Sociology Peter Francis Harvey M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
SOCI 002-301 Social Prob & Pub Policy Charles Bosk TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course approaches some of today's important social and political issues from a sociological vantage point. The course begins by asking where social problems come from. The main sociological perspectives of Marx, Weber and Durkheim are developed in connection with the issues of inequality, social conflict and community. We then turn to the social construction of social problems by examining how various issues become defined as social problems. This involves a consideration of the role of the media, social experts and social movements. The last section of the course considers how social problems are addressed. Here we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of government programs and regulations versus market-based approached. We also discuss the role of philanthropy and volunteerism. Finally, we consider the risk of unanticipated consequences of reforms. Along the way, we will consider a variety of social issues and social problems, including poverty, immigration, crime, global warming, and education.
SOCI 003-601 Deviance Tyler G Baldor W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM A sociological analysis of the origins, development, and reactions surrounding deviance in contemporary society. Topics include labeling theory, stigma, social organization, tradition, social power, crime, sexual deviance, drug use, and racism. Theoretical and methodological issues will be discussed and evaluated. Society Sector
SOCI 004-401 The Family Pilar Gonalons-Pons MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Most men and women get married during their lifetimes. In addition, most men and women become fathers and mothers at some point. This class presents social science evidence on the family. For example, it shows how "greedy" workplaces, which require long work hours, create work-family conflicts for husbands and wives. The class also illuminates how men and women have different experiences within families. The lectures will also examine how economic inequality shapes family life. Students will have the opportunity to apply key concepts to daily life. All are welcome. GSWS004401 Society Sector
SOCI 005-001 American Society Charles Bosk TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM What is American Society? The literary critic, Leslie Fielder once wrote,"...to be an American...precisely to imagine a destiny rather than to inherit one; since we have always been, insofar as we are Americans at all, inhabitants of myth rather than history..." In this course we will explore the elements of the myth that form the basis of the civil religion as well as the facts on the ground that contradict our conceptions of American Society. Examples of mythic elements and their contradiction that we will explore are: A nation founded to pursue liberty and freedom yet allowed slavery, equality of opportunity and persistent structural inequality, and a welcoming of the Immigrant coupled with a suspicion of the outsider. Humanities & Social Science Sector
SOCI 006-401 Race & Ethnic Relations Vani S Kulkarni TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM The course will focus on race and ethnicity in the United States. We begin with a brief history of racial categorization and immigration to the U.S. The course continues by examining a number of topics including racial and ethnic identity, interracial and interethnic friendships and marriage, racial attitudes, mass media images, residential segregation, educational stratification, and labor market outcomes. The course will include discussions of African Americans, Whites, Hispanics, Asian Americans and multiracials. AFRC006401, ASAM006401 Cultural Diversity in the US
SOCI 010-301 Social Stratification Xi Song F 02:00 PM-05:00 PM In this course we study the current levels and historical trends of inequality in the United States especially in cross-national comparative perspective. We discuss causes and consequences of inequality as well as various policy efforts to deal with inequality. Topics include intergenerational social mobility, income inequality, education, gender, race and ethnicity among others. Society Sector
SOCI 011-401 Urban Sociology R. Tyson Smith TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is a comprehensive introduction to the sociological study of urban areas. This includes more general topics as the rise of cities and theories urbanism, as well as more specific areas of inquiry, including American urbanism, segregation, urban poverty, suburbanization and sprawl, neighborhoods and crime, and immigrant ghettos. The course will also devote significant attention to globalization and the process of urbanization in less developed counties. URBS112401, AFRC011401
SOCI 028-401 The Sociology of Black Community Haley Grace Pilgrim T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course explores a broad set of issues defining important aspects of the Black/African American experience. In addition to the "usual suspects" (e.g., race, socioeconomic status, poverty, gender, and group culture), we also think about matters of health and well-being, the family, education, and identity in Black/African American communities. Our goal is to gain a deeper sociological understanding and appreciation of the diverse and ever-changing life experiences of Blacks/African Americans. AFRC008401 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
For Freshmen Only
SOCI 030-301 Engaging Intersectionality: Unpacking Inequality in Everyday Life Sonita Rolinda Moss T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Who belongs within the fabric of American society? Put another way, who is protected by social and political structures and institutions and who is targeted? In what ways do social categories such as race, class, and gender render or reduce equal access to socio-political structures and institutions? Black feminist scholars have uncovered the ways in which social categories such as race and gender augment one's social standing in American society, including the provision of equality, opportunity, and outcomes. Legal scholar Kimberle Crenshaw coined the term "intersectionality" to describe the interlocking oppressions that black women uniquely faced as occupants of two social identity categories: "black" and "woman", not one or the other. Since then, critical scholars have greatly expanded the concept to include non-black women and other groups. Further, there has been a call to examine marginalized social groups beyond their oppressed status, but as agents of change. In this course, we will develop theoretical and practical knowledge of intersectionality in contemporary American society that goes beyond the original formulation of the theory. This is a critical speaking seminar with a focus on improving and evaluating oral communication skills. We will discuss the theoretical tenets of intersectionality and its uses for analyzing pressing social problems. Each week, we will analyze a contemporary sociological issue, drawing from popular culture, visual mediums, multi-media, and new media to understand and apply intersectionality theory. There will be written and spoken communication assignments due weekly. In addition to in-class assignments, our work will culminate in two major oral communication projects: an individual and group oral communication project, both with a multitude of creative possibilities. Come prepared to engage yourself as an orator, collaborator, and sociological thinker. Communication Within the Curriculum
SOCI 033-401 Technology & Society Adelheid Clara Voskuhl TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Technology plays an increasing role in our understandings of ourselves, our communities, and our societies, in how we think about politics and war, science and religion, work and play. Humans have made and used technologies, though, for thousands if not millions of years. In this course, we will use this history as a resource to understand how technologies affect social relations, and conversely how the culture of a society shapes the technologies it produces. Do different technologies produce or result from different economic systems like feudalism, capitalism and communism? Can specific technologies promote democratic or authoritarian politics? Do they suggest or enforce different patterns of race, class or gender relations? Among the technologies we'll consider will be large objects like cathedrals, bridges, and airplanes; small ones like guns, clocks and birth control pills; and networks like the electrical grid, the highway system and the internet. HSOC003401, STSC003401 Society Sector
SOCI 041-301 Environmental Sociology Daniel A Cohen TR 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Freshman Seminar
SOCI 041-302 Poverty & Inequality Regina S Baker W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Cultural Diversity in the US Freshman Seminar
SOCI 100-401 Introduction To Sociological Research Melissa J. Wilde MW 02:00 PM-03:00 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 100-402 Introduction To Sociological Research R 11:00 AM-12:00 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-403 Introduction To Sociological Research R 12:00 PM-01:00 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-404 Introduction To Sociological Research F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-405 Introduction To Sociological Research F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100405 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 101-401 Bioethics Meghan L Crnic MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 101-402 Bioethics R 05:00 PM-06:00 PM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 101-403 Bioethics R 06:00 PM-07:00 PM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 101-404 Bioethics F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 101-405 Bioethics F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102405 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 111-401 Health of Populations Irma Elo MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC111401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 111-402 Health of Populations F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC111402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 111-403 Health of Populations F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC111403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 113-301 Economic Inequality, Advantage and the Rich Katharina Hecht T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This class explores key issues of inequality from the perspective of advantage. While social scientists studying inequality have more traditionally focused on poverty and disadvantage, we will read and discuss issues of capital, riches, and economic advantage, paying attention to intersections of economic advantage and riches with gender, 'race' and class. We will address inequalities in the labour as well as capital markets, debate how we can conceptualise and measure those who are 'rich', and look at the relationship between riches, whiteness, masculinity and privilege. Students are encouraged to bring their ideas of riches and advantage to class.
SOCI 120-001 Social Statistics Pilar Gonalons-Pons MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 120-201 Social Statistics R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-202 Social Statistics R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-203 Social Statistics F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-204 Social Statistics F 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 125-301 Classical Sociological Theory Stephen R. Viscelli TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course will cover the founding classics of the sociological tradition including works of Tocqueville, Marx and Engels, Weber, Durkheim, Mauss, Simmel, and G.H.Mead. We will also examine how the major traditions have continued and transformed into theories of conflict, domination, resistance and social change; social solidarity, ritual and symbolism; symbolic interactionist and phenomenological theory of discourse, self and mind. This course satisfies the theory requirement for sociology majors.
SOCI 135-001 Law & Society CANCELED After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings included research reports, statutes and cases.
SOCI 135-401 Law & Society Hocine Fetni W 06:30 PM-09:30 PM After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings included research reports, statutes and cases. AFRC135401 Cultural Diversity in the US
SOCI 135-601 Law & Society Hocine Fetni CANCELED After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings included research reports, statutes and cases. AFRC135601 Cultural Diversity in the US
SOCI 137-401 Sociology of Media and Popular Culture David I Grazian MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137401 Society Sector Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 137-402 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 137-403 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 137-404 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 137-405 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137405 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 159-401 Population and Public Health in Eastern Europe Kristen R Ghodsee TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Since the collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe (and 1991 in the Soviet Union), many of the countries in the region have experienced public health crises and demographic catastrophe. Below replacement fertility rates and massive out migration have decimated the populations of these countries even as populations age and place unsustainable strains on pension systems and medical services. The demographic collapse has also been accompanied by falling male life expectancy and the rise of alcoholism, depression, domestic violence, and suicide. The economic exigencies of the transition from communism to capitalism dismantled welfare states at the exact moment when health services were most needed, leaving charities and nongovernmental organization to try to fill in the gaps. Through a combination of readings from the fields of epidemiology, demography, and medical anthropology, this course examines the public health implications of poverty and social dislocation in post-communist states. All readings and assignments are in English. REES159401, ANTH159401
SOCI 161-401 Information Age Stephanie A Dick TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Certain new technologies are greeted with claims that, for good or ill, they must transform our society. The two most recent: the computer and the Internet. But the series of social, economic and technological developments that underlie what is often called the Information Revolution include much more than just the computer. In this course, we explore the history of information technology and its role in contemporary society. We will explore both the technologies themselves--calculating machines, punched card tabulators, telegraph and telephone networks, differential analyzers, digital computers, and many others--and their larger social, economic and political contexts. To understand the roots of these ideas we look at the prehistory of the computer, at the idea of the post-industrial or information society, at parallels with earlier technologies and at broad historical currents in the United States and the world. STSC160401 Humanities & Social Science Sector
SOCI 200-401 Criminal Justice Brandy Blasko TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM This course examines how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The course reviews the historical development of criminal justice agencies in the United States and Europe and the available scientific evidence on the effect these agencies have on controlling crime. The course places an emphasis on the functional creation of criminal justice agencies and the discretionary role decision makers in these agencies have in deciding how to enforce criminal laws and whom to punish. Evidence on how society measures crime and the role that each major criminal justice agency plays in controlling crime is examined from the perspective of crime victims, police, prosecutors, jurors, judges, prison officials, probation officers and parole board members. Using the model of social policy evaluation, the course asks students to consider how the results of criminal justice could be more effectively delivered to reduce the social and economic costs of crime. CRIM200401 Society Sector
SOCI 222-301 Field Methods of Sociological Research Stephen R. Viscelli TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course is designed to introduce students to field methods in sociological research, with a focus on participant-observation and interviewing. During this course, students will read original research based on field methods and discuss their strengths, limitations, and ethical dilemmas. Most importantly, students will design their own research projects and become ethnographers and interviewers. Students will be guided through the fieldwork process from data collection to analysis, and will turn in multiple assignments and original research paper.
SOCI 235-401 Law and Social Change Hocine Fetni TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM Beginning with discussion of various perspectives on social change and law, this course then examines in detail the interdependent relationship between changes in legal and societal institutions. Emphasis will be placed on (1) how and when law can be an instrument for social change, and (2) how and when social change can cause legal change. In the assessment of this relationship, emphasis will be on the laws of the United States. However, laws of other countries and international law relevant to civil liberties, economic, social and political progress will be studied. Throughout the course, discussions will include legal controversies relevant to social change such as issues of race, gender and the law. Other issues relevanat to State-Building and development will discussed. A comparative framework will be used in the analysis of this interdependent relationship between law and social change. AFRC235401
SOCI 254-401 Cities,Suburbs,Regions Karen Lisa Black T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course will explore the political, economic, social, and demographic forces impacting development patterns in metropolitan areas, with a particular focus on Philadelphia. We will examine the government policies, economic forces, and social attitudes that affect the way a region grows, and the impact of these forces on poverty, equity and segregation. Specific topics to be discussed include the factors that make a region competitive, the city's changing role in the region, the impact place has on opportunity, and approaches to revitalizing and improving communities. URBS253401 Permission Needed From Department
SOCI 270-401 The Immigrant City Domenic Vitiello W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course focuses on immigrant communities in United States cities and suburbs. We survey migration and community experiences among a broad range of ethnic groups in different city and suburban neighborhoods. Class readings, discussions, and visits to Philadelphia neighborhoods explore themes including labor markets, commerce, housing, civil society, racial and ethnic relations, integration, refugee resettlement, and local, state, and national immigration policies. The class introduces students to a variety of social science approaches to studying social groups and neighborhoods, including readings in sociology, geography, anthropology, social history, and political science. Ultimately, the class aims to help students develop: 1) a broad knowledge of immigration and its impacts on U.S. cities and regions; 2) a comparative understanding of diverse migrant and receiving communities; and 3) familiarity with policies and institutions that seek to influence immigration and immigrant communities. LALS273401, URBS270401 Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=SOCI270401
SOCI 277-401 Mental Illness Jason S Schnittker MWF 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course is designed to give a general overview of how sociologists study mental illness. We will be concerned with describing the contributions of sociological research and exploring how these contributions differ from those of psychology, psychiatry, and social work. This overview will be done in three parts: we will discuss (i) what "mental illness" is, (ii) precisely how many Americans are mentally ill, (iii) how social factors (e.g. race, gender, class) and social arrangements (e.g. social networks) lead to mental illness, and (iv) how we as a society respond to and treat the mentally ill. Throughout the course, we will be concerned with uncovering the assumptions behind different definitions of mental health and exploring their political, social, and legal implications. HSOC277401
SOCI 300-301 Thesis Workshop Chenoa A. Flippen W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM The purpose of this course is to guide senior sociology majors in writing a research proposal for a senior honors thesis. Students will learn about various research approaches, how to write a focused literature review, and kinds of data necessary to answer a wide variety of research questions, including their own. Throughout the course, students will work on designing a research question, generation researchable hypotheses, and coming up with a design for their proposed study. The final paper for this course will be a research proposal that is the basis for students' independent research project. This course satisfies the research requirement for sociology majors and is designed primarily for seniors who are planning to write an honors thesis. Non-Majors Need Permission From Department
Permission Needed From Department
Majors Only
SOCI 307-401 Race, Science & Justice Dorothy E Roberts MW 04:00 PM-05:00 PM AFRC307401 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 307-402 Race, Science & Justice F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM AFRC307402 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 307-403 Race, Science & Justice F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM AFRC307403 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 425-401 Latin@ Cultural History: the Resiliency and Impact of Latin@ Cultural Expressions in the Us Johnny Irizarry T 05:30 PM-08:30 PM This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of the resiliency and impact of Latin@ cultural and artistic contributions, esthetics, expressions and institution building in the United States from the Civil Rights Era to the present. We will explore how Latin@s argriculturally define being "American"; how their artistic expressions fit and influence the creativity and productivity of American and global Arts & Cultural expressions; and the Latin@ interactions of race, culture, society, economy and politics in the U.S. LALS425401 Cultural Diversity in the US
SOCI 434-401 Design Green New Deal William J Fleming
Daniel A Cohen
W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This advanced social science and design seminar is about mobilizing expert knowledge to develop transformative policy ideas to make the Green New Deal come alive. We'll look at cutting edge social science and design scholarship on the problems we're trying to solve, and the successes and failures of past efforts at transformative policy. And we'll focus in particular on the built environment. How might a Green New Deal make the physical changes to our infrastructures, homes, energy landscapes, transportation systems, public recreation amenities, care facilities, and more, in ways that slash carbon emissions, increase resiliency, and abolish inequalities of race, class, gender, and nation? That's not a rhetorical question: in this class, we'll assemble knowledge, get into teams, and come up with concrete proposals. LARP734401
SOCI 460-401 Adv Tpcs in Africana Std: the US and Human Rights: Policies and Practices Hocine Fetni R 06:00 PM-09:00 PM Advanced Topics in Africana Studies AFRC420401 Cultural Diversity in the US
SOCI 536-401 Quantitative Methods II Hyunjoon Park W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM As the second part of a two-semester sequence, this graduate course focuses on regression analysis as used in social science research. In particular, we discuss features and assumptions of linear regression and logistic regression models. We learn how to apply regression models to real social science data using Stata and how to interpret the results. DEMG536401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 536-402 Quantitative Methods in Sociology II F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM As the second part of a two-semester sequence, this graduate course focuses on regression analysis as used in social science research. In particular, we discuss features and assumptions of linear regression and logistic regression models. We learn how to apply regression models to real social science data using Stata and how to interpret the results. DEMG536402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 536-403 Quantitative Methods in Sociology II F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM As the second part of a two-semester sequence, this graduate course focuses on regression analysis as used in social science research. In particular, we discuss features and assumptions of linear regression and logistic regression models. We learn how to apply regression models to real social science data using Stata and how to interpret the results. DEMG536403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 536-404 Quantitative Methods in Sociology II R 11:30 AM-12:30 PM As the second part of a two-semester sequence, this graduate course focuses on regression analysis as used in social science research. In particular, we discuss features and assumptions of linear regression and logistic regression models. We learn how to apply regression models to real social science data using Stata and how to interpret the results. DEMG536404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 541-301 Work & Careers in the 21st Century Jerry A Jacobs W 03:30 PM-06:30 PM Drawing from sociology, economics and demography, this course examines the causes and effects of gender differences in labor force participation, earnings and occupation in the United States and in the rest of the developed and developing world. Differences by race, ethnicity and sexual preference are also considered. Theories of labor supply, marriage, human capital and discrimination are explored as explanations for the observed trends. Finally, the course reviews current labor market policies and uses the theories of labor supply, marriage, human capital and discrimination to evaluate their effects on women and men.
SOCI 560-301 Sociology of Religion Melissa J. Wilde W 09:00 AM-12:00 PM Undergraduates Need Permission
SOCI 604-401 Methodology of Social Research Wendy Roth R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course will give students familiarity with the common research methods social scientists use to conduct research. Ethnographic, interview, survey, experimental and historical/comparative research methods will be covered. Four themes will be explored: 1) the basics of solid research design, 2) the various advantages and disadvantages of each method, 3) when the use of a method is appropriate or inappropriate for the research question, and 4) how to evaluate researchers' claims on the basis of the evidence they present. These themes will be explored by reading examples of and conducting exercises designed to give students hands-on experience in each of the methods. Students will conduct the exercises on a topic of their choice, which together will culminate in their final paper. The course is required and restricted to second year students in sociology and demography. DEMG604401 For PhD Students Only
Majors Only
SOCI 708-401 Second-Year Research Seminar II Melissa J. Wilde T 09:00 AM-12:00 PM Demography 708 is the second part of a two-course sequence designed to introduce and familiarize second year students with current norms for academic research, presentation and publishing in the field of Demography. In Demg708 students are expected to finalize the analyses and to complete their second year research paper. This is a required course for second year demography students. Others interested in enrolling in the course may do so with the permission of the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography. DEMG708401 For PhD Students Only
Majors Only