Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
SOCI 001-401 Introduction To Sociology Jerry A Jacobs MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002401 Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI001401
SOCI 001-402 Introduction To Sociology Ellen Bryer CANCELED Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002402 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-403 Introduction To Sociology Ellen Bryer CANCELED Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002403 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-404 Introduction To Sociology Yezhen Li R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002404 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-405 Introduction To Sociology Yezhen Li R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002405 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-406 Introduction To Sociology Yasmin Amira Mertehikian F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002406 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-407 Introduction To Sociology Yasmin Amira Mertehikian F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002407 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-601 Intro To Sociology Dylan Elisabeth Farrell-Bryan W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI001601
SOCI 004-601 The Family Lauren Elizabeth Harris T 04:30 PM-07:30 PM Family life is deeply personal but at the same time is dramatically impacted by social forces outside of the family. In this course we will examine how families are organized along the lines of gender, sexuality, social class, and race and how these affect family life. We will consider how family life is continually changing while at the same time traditional gender roles persist. For example, how "greedy" workplaces, which require long work hours, create work-family conflicts for mothers and fathers. We will also examine diverse family forms including single-parent families, blended families, families headed by same-gender parents, and families headed by gender non-conforming parents. The lectures will also examine how economic inequality shapes family life. Students will have the opportunity to apply key concepts to daily life. GSWS004601 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req.
Society Sector
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI004601
SOCI 010-001 Social Stratification Yun Cha T 03:00 PM-05:00 PM In this course we study the current levels and historical trends of inequality in the United States especially in cross-national comparative perspective. We discuss causes and consequences of inequality as well as various policy efforts to deal with inequality. Topics include intergenerational social mobility, income inequality, education, gender, race and ethnicity among others. Society Sector Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI010001
SOCI 033-401 Technology & Society Adelheid Clara Voskuhl TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Technology plays an increasing role in our understandings of ourselves, our communities, and our societies, in how we think about politics and war, science and religion, work and play. Humans have made and used technologies, though, for thousands if not millions of years. In this course, we will use this history as a resource to understand how technologies affect social relations, and conversely how the culture of a society shapes the technologies it produces. Do different technologies produce or result from different economic systems like feudalism, capitalism and communism? Can specific technologies promote democratic or authoritarian politics? Do they suggest or enforce different patterns of race, class or gender relations? Among the technologies we'll consider will be large objects like cathedrals, bridges, and airplanes; small ones like guns, clocks and birth control pills; and networks like the electrical grid, the highway system and the internet. HSOC003401, STSC003401 Society Sector Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI033401
SOCI 041-305 Sociology of Race and Ethnicity Wendy Roth MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen.
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI041305
SOCI 041-306 Social Inequality and Health Courtney E Boen W 03:30 PM-04:30 PM Cultural Diversity in the US Course Online: Synchronous Format
Freshman Seminar
SOCI 041-307 Sociology of Education Annette Lareau T 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Cultural Diversity in the US An Academically Based Community Serv Course
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI041307
SOCI 041-308 The Law in Our Lives Hocine Fetni CANCELED Course Online: Synchronous Format
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI041308
SOCI 100-401 Introduction To Sociological Research Melissa J. Wilde W 10:00 AM-11:00 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI100401
SOCI 100-402 Sociological Research Methods Ellen Bryer R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100402 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-403 Sociological Research Methods Ellen Bryer R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100403 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-404 Sociological Research Methods Elena Gayle Van Stee F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100404 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-405 Sociological Research Methods Elena Gayle Van Stee F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100405 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-406 Sociological Research Methods Elena Gayle Van Stee R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100406 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-407 Sociological Research Methods Elena Gayle Van Stee F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100407 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-601 Introduction To Sociological Research CANCELED One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100601 Course Online: Asynchronous Format
SOCI 101-401 Bioethics Meghan L Crnic MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102401 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI101401
SOCI 101-402 Bioethics R 05:00 PM-06:00 PM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102402 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 101-403 Bioethics R 06:00 PM-07:00 PM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102403 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 101-404 Bioethics Zachary Meir Loeb F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102404 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 101-405 Bioethics Zachary Meir Loeb F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102405 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 111-401 Health of Populations Irma Elo M 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC111401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI111401
SOCI 111-402 Health of Populations Irma Elo W 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC111402 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI111402
SOCI 111-403 Health of Populations Irma Elo F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC111403 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI111403
SOCI 120-401 Social Statistics Pilar Gonalons-Pons MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI120401
SOCI 120-402 Social Statistics Samantha Love R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120402 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-403 Social Statistics Samantha Love R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120403 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-404 Social Statistics Allison Nicole Dunatchik F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120404 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-405 Social Statistics Allison Nicole Dunatchik F 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120405 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 122-401 Sociology of Gender Robin Lisa Leidner TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Gender is an organizing principle of society, shaping social structures, cultural understandings, processes of interaction, and identities in ways that have profound consequences. It affects every aspect of people's lives, from their intimate relationships to their participation in work, family, government, and other social institutions and their place in the stratification system. Yet gender is such a taken for granted basis for differences among people that it can be hard to see the underlying social structures and cultural forces that reinforce or weaken the social boundaries that define gender. Differences in behavior, power, and experience are often seen as the result of biological imperatives or of individual choice. A sociological view of gender, in contrast, emphasizes how gender is socially constructed and how structural constraints limit choice. This course examines how differences based on gender are created and sustained, with particular attention to how other important bases of personal identity and social inequality--race and class-interact with patterns of gender relations. We will also seek to understand how social change happens and how gender inequality might be reduced. GSWS122401 Society Sector Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI122401
SOCI 125-001 Sociological Theory Stephen R. Viscelli TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course will cover the founding classics of the sociological tradition including works of Tocqueville, Marx and Engels, Weber, Durkheim, Mauss, Simmel, and G.H.Mead. We will also examine how the major traditions have continued and transformed into theories of conflict, domination, resistance and social change; social solidarity, ritual and symbolism; symbolic interactionist and phenomenological theory of discourse, self and mind. This course satisfies the theory requirement for sociology majors. Course Online: Synchronous Format
SOCI 135-401 Law & Society Hocine Fetni TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings included research reports, statutes and cases. AFRC135401 Cultural Diversity in the US Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI135401
SOCI 137-401 Sociology of Media and Popular Culture David I Grazian M 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137401 Society Sector Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI137401
SOCI 137-402 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture Alejandra Regla-Vargas R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137402 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 137-403 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture Alejandra Regla-Vargas R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137403 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 137-404 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture Jack Raymond Thornton F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137404 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 137-405 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture Jack Raymond Thornton F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137405 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 159-401 Eeur Popul &Pub. Health Kristen R Ghodsee MW 09:30 AM-11:00 AM Since the collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe (and 1991 in the Soviet Union), many of the countries in the region have experienced public health crises and demographic catastrophe. Below replacement fertility rates and massive out migration have decimated the populations of these countries even as populations age and place unsustainable strains on pension systems and medical services. The demographic collapse has also been accompanied by falling male life expectancy and the rise of alcoholism, depression, domestic violence, and suicide. The economic exigencies of the transition from communism to capitalism dismantled welfare states at the exact moment when health services were most needed, leaving charities and nongovernmental organization to try to fill in the gaps. Through a combination of readings from the fields of epidemiology, demography, and medical anthropology, this course examines the public health implications of poverty and social dislocation in post-communist states. All readings and assignments are in English. REES159401, ANTH159401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI159401
SOCI 161-401 Information Age Etienne S Benson TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Certain new technologies are greeted with claims that, for good or ill, they must transform our society. The two most recent: the computer and the Internet. But the series of social, economic and technological developments that underlie what is often called the Information Revolution include much more than just the computer. In this course, we explore the history of information technology and its role in contemporary society. We will explore both the technologies themselves--calculating machines, punched card tabulators, telegraph and telephone networks, differential analyzers, digital computers, and many others--and their larger social, economic and political contexts. To understand the roots of these ideas we look at the prehistory of the computer, at the idea of the post-industrial or information society, at parallels with earlier technologies and at broad historical currents in the United States and the world. STSC160401 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Humanities & Social Science Sector
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI161401
SOCI 200-401 Criminal Justice Maria Cuellar TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course examines how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The course reviews the historical development of criminal justice agencies in the United States and Europe and the available scientific evidence on the effect these agencies have on controlling crime. The course places an emphasis on the functional creation of criminal justice agencies and the discretionary role decision makers in these agencies have in deciding how to enforce criminal laws and whom to punish. Evidence on how society measures crime and the role that each major criminal justice agency plays in controlling crime is examined from the perspective of crime victims, police, prosecutors, jurors, judges, prison officials, probation officers and parole board members. Using the model of social policy evaluation, the course asks students to consider how the results of criminal justice could be more effectively delivered to reduce the social and economic costs of crime. CRIM200401 Society Sector Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI200401
SOCI 222-301 Field Methods of Sociological Research Stephen R. Viscelli TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course is designed to introduce students to field methods in sociological research, with a focus on participant-observation and interviewing. During this course, students will read original research based on field methods and discuss their strengths, limitations, and ethical dilemmas. Most importantly, students will design their own research projects and become ethnographers and interviewers. Students will be guided through the fieldwork process from data collection to analysis, and will turn in multiple assignments and original research paper. Course Online: Synchronous Format
SOCI 249-301 Coming of Age East Asia: Work, Love and Independence: Coming of Age in East Asia Hyunjoon Park CANCELED How do millennials in East Asia make transition to adulthood? What does it mean to become an adult in East Asia? Under the contexts of rapid educational expansion, growing economic inequality, and shifting cultural norms, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese young people are facing various challenges in coming of age. The dim outlook for landing a full-time, stable, and good job, for instance, had led many Korean millennials to 'give up' dating, marriage, and parenting, considered as major milestones of adulthood. More and more young millennials delay departure from their parental home. At the same time, East Asian millennials are highly educated, tech-savvy, and culturally diverse, distinguishing themselves from older generations. This course first offers an overall view of changing patterns and timing of transition to adulthood in East Asia (particularly compared to experiences of young adults in the United States and Europe). In the class, students will be able to identify demographic, cultural and economic factors that shape specific pathways to adulthood in East Asia. The course highlights diversity and heterogeneity in stories of coming of age among East Asian millennials from different socioeconomic, cultural, and demographic backgrounds. Diverse narratives and perceptions of adulthood in East Asia are discussed. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI249301
SOCI 254-401 Cities,Suburbs,Regions CANCELED This course will explore the political, economic, social, and demographic forces impacting development patterns in metropolitan areas, with a particular focus on Philadelphia. We will examine the government policies, economic forces, and social attitudes that affect the way a region grows, and the impact of these forces on poverty, equity and segregation. Specific topics to be discussed include the factors that make a region competitive, the city's changing role in the region, the impact place has on opportunity, and approaches to revitalizing and improving communities.
SOCI 270-401 The Immigrant City Domenic Vitiello M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course focuses on immigrant communities in United States cities and suburbs. We survey migration and community experiences among a broad range of ethnic groups in different city and suburban neighborhoods. Class readings, discussions, and visits to Philadelphia neighborhoods explore themes including labor markets, commerce, housing, civil society, racial and ethnic relations, integration, refugee resettlement, and local, state, and national immigration policies. The class introduces students to a variety of social science approaches to studying social groups and neighborhoods, including readings in sociology, geography, anthropology, social history, and political science. Ultimately, the class aims to help students develop: 1) a broad knowledge of immigration and its impacts on U.S. cities and regions; 2) a comparative understanding of diverse migrant and receiving communities; and 3) familiarity with policies and institutions that seek to influence immigration and immigrant communities. LALS273401, URBS270401 Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Permission Needed From Instructor
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI270401
SOCI 300-301 Thesis Workshop Chenoa A. Flippen R 03:00 PM-04:30 PM The purpose of this course is to guide senior sociology majors in writing a research proposal for a senior honors thesis. Students will learn about various research approaches, how to write a focused literature review, and kinds of data necessary to answer a wide variety of research questions, including their own. Throughout the course, students will work on designing a research question, generation researchable hypotheses, and coming up with a design for their proposed study. The final paper for this course will be a research proposal that is the basis for students' independent research project. This course satisfies the research requirement for sociology majors and is designed primarily for seniors who are planning to write an honors thesis. Non-Majors Need Permission From Department
Permission Needed From Department
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Majors Only
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI300301
SOCI 304-301 The Future of Work Benjamin J Shestakofsky W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course draws on sociological and social scientific research and theorizing to conceptualize the complex and dynamic relationship between work and technology. Rather than viewing technology as an immutable force that sweeps across societies and leaves social change in its wake, we will examine how the design, implementation, and outcomes of technological change are imbricated in political, economic, and social forces. We will mostly, though not exclusively, focus on developments in and case studies of work and technology in the United States. We will begin by examining theoretical perspectives on the historical interplay between work and technology. Then, we will consider contemporary issues, building dialogues between our theoretical groundwork and empirical evidence to trace continuities and disjunctures. By the end of the course, you will be equipped to interrogate the role of technology in capitalism's past, understand its relation to our present age of digital disruption, and imagine the possibilities for our uncertain future. Course Online: Synchronous Format
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI304301
SOCI 306-301 Families and Capitalism Pilar Gonalons-Pons M 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Despite highly romanticized and idealized views about family life, families play a crucial role in sustaining and organizing capitalist societies and inequalities by race, gender, and class. This course reviews classic and contemporary social theory to understand how family norms and behaviors shape and are shaped by political and economic structures. Students will learn about capitalism, racism, heteronormativity, and patriarchy, and engage with questions that connect these to family norms and behaviors. This includes questions like: why has gay marriage been outlawed until recently? Why were slaves denied marriage and family life? Why is caring for others disproportionately done by women and often unpaid? Why is poverty related to unstable family lives? Through engaging with this class material students will learn how to sociologically and critically rethink current family issues and the future of family life. Class structure and goals: This class requires carefully reading social theory texts (many of these texts might be dense, we will learn how to read them efficiently) and active participation in class discussion. Students will prepare short presentations, discussion questions, and write a research paper analyzing one policy related to family life (analyzing its politics and its relation to the social structures covered in class). Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI306301
SOCI 307-401 Race, Science & Justice Dorothy E Roberts MW 04:00 PM-05:00 PM AFRC307401 Cultural Diversity in the US Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI307401
SOCI 307-402 Race, Science & Justice Rebecca Anna Schut F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM AFRC307402 Cultural Diversity in the US Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 307-403 Race, Science & Justice Rebecca Anna Schut F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM AFRC307403 Cultural Diversity in the US Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 425-401 The Resiliency and Impact of Latin@ Cultural Expressions in the Us Johnny Irizarry T 05:30 PM-08:30 PM This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of the resiliency and impact of Latin@ cultural and artistic contributions, esthetics, expressions and institution building in the United States from the Civil Rights Era to the present. We will explore how Latin@s argriculturally define being "American"; how their artistic expressions fit and influence the creativity and productivity of American and global Arts & Cultural expressions; and the Latin@ interactions of race, culture, society, economy and politics in the U.S. LALS425401 Cultural Diversity in the US Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI425401
SOCI 460-401 Adv Tpcs in Africana Std: the US and Human Rights: Policies and Practices Hocine Fetni R 06:00 PM-09:00 PM Topics vary. See the Africana Studies Department's course list at https://africana.sas.upenn.edu for a description of the current offering. After an examination of the philosophical, legal, and political perspectives on Human Rights, this course will focus on US policies and practices relevant to Human Rights. Toward that end, emphasis will be placed on both the domestic and the international aspects of Human Rights as reflected in US policies and practices. Domestically, the course will discuss (1) the process of incorporating the International Bill of Human Rights into the American legal system and (2) the US position on and practices regarding the political, civil, economic, social, and cultural rights of minorities and various other groups within the US. Internationally, the course will examine US Human Rights policies toward Africa. Specific cases of Rwanda, Kenya, South Africa and Egypt, as well as other cases from the continent, will be presented in the assessment of US successes and failures in the pursuit of its Human Rights strategy in Africa. Readings will include research papers, reports, statutes, treaties, and cases. AFRC420401 Cultural Diversity in the US Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI460401
SOCI 533-401 Soci Race and Ethnic Tukufu Zuberi W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Race and ethnicity are, above all, both converge as system of ideas by which men and women imagine the human body and their relationships within society. In this course we will question the concept of race and ethnicity and their place in modern society (1500 - 2020). While the course reviews the pre-1500 literature our focus will be on the last 500 years. This course reviews the research that has contributed to the ideas about ethnicity and race in human society. The review covers the discourse on race in political propaganda, religious doctrine, philosophy, history, biology and other human sciences. AFRC535401 Course Online: Synchronous Format
SOCI 536-401 Quantitative Methods II Hyunjoon Park T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM As the second part of a two-semester sequence, this graduate course focuses on regression analysis as used in social science research. In particular, we discuss features and assumptions of linear regression and logistic regression models. We learn how to apply regression models to real social science data using Stata and how to interpret the results. DEMG536401 Permission Needed From Instructor
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 536-402 Quantitative Methods in Sociology II Taylor Renee Heath F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM As the second part of a two-semester sequence, this graduate course focuses on regression analysis as used in social science research. In particular, we discuss features and assumptions of linear regression and logistic regression models. We learn how to apply regression models to real social science data using Stata and how to interpret the results. DEMG536402 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 542-401 Work and Gender Robin Lisa Leidner W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This seminar examines the relevance of gender to the organization and experience of paid and unpaid work. Combining materialist and social constructionist approaches, we will consider occupational segregation, the relation of work and family, gender and class solidarity, the construction of gender through work, race and class variation in work experiences, and related topics. GSWS542401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI542401
SOCI 553-301 Field Meth. Social Res Benjamin J Shestakofsky F 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course is designed to introduce graduate students to basic skills and concepts in ethnographic field research, including participant observation, interviewing, field documentation, and the scholarly presentation of qualitative data. Students will learn to apply these skills and concepts through an assigned set of exercises in concert with a semester-long project based on intensive fieldwork at a research site of their choosing. In addition, we will examine exemplars of published fieldwork in both classical and contemporary sociology. Students outside of the Department of Sociology need permission of the instructor to enroll. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI553301
SOCI 563-301 Inequal Class Race Gend: Mechanisms For Perpetuating Or Reducing Inequality By Class, Race & Gender Annette Lareau M 05:30 PM-08:30 PM Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI563301
SOCI 604-401 Methodology of Social Research Wendy Roth M 09:00 AM-12:00 PM This course will give students familiarity with the common research methods social scientists use to conduct research. Ethnographic, interview, survey, experimental and historical/comparative research methods will be covered. Four themes will be explored: 1) the basics of solid research design, 2) the various advantages and disadvantages of each method, 3) when the use of a method is appropriate or inappropriate for the research question, and 4) how to evaluate researchers' claims on the basis of the evidence they present. These themes will be explored by reading examples of and conducting exercises designed to give students hands-on experience in each of the methods. Students will conduct the exercises on a topic of their choice, which together will culminate in their final paper. The course is required and restricted to second year students in sociology and demography. DEMG604401 For PhD Students Only
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Majors Only
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI604401
SOCI 628-401 Migration & Development Domenic Vitiello T 09:00 AM-12:00 PM Human migration is one of the most important phenomena driving urban, social community and economic development. This course focuses on the ways that migrants and community, government, and private institutions work to influence development around the world. We explore a range of large- and small-scale economic development, social and community development. After a brief introduction to histories and theories of migration and development, our major themes include: Local revitalization, labor and housing markets, workforce and enterprise development; Diaspora-led transational development, including remittances, hometown and country associations, and transnational advocacy and community orgnaizing; The work of instituions, governments, and private sector firms in sending and receiving nations that influence migration and development. Readings are drawn from a variety of social sciences, plannning and development studies, including from academic and practice. Guests from local and transnational development organizations will visit the class. Assignments include short papers on the readings and a research paper or project designed by each student in consultation with the instructor. Ultimately, the course aims to help students develop: 1) a broad knowledge of migration and development in geographic and institutional settings around the world; 2) an in-depth understanding of community and economic development practices in migrant sending and receiving communities; and 3) familiarity with social science approaches to evaluating the dynamics and impacts of migration and development. CPLN628401
SOCI 708-401 Second-Year Research Seminar II Melissa J. Wilde R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM Demography 708 is the second part of a two-course sequence designed to introduce and familiarize second year students with current norms for academic research, presentation and publishing in the field of Demography. In Demg708 students are expected to finalize the analyses and to complete their second year research paper. This is a required course for second year demography students. Others interested in enrolling in the course may do so with the permission of the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography. DEMG708401 For PhD Students Only
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Majors Only
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=SOCI708401
SOCI 995-046 Dissertation