Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
SOCI 0004-301 The Law in our Lives Hocine Fetni CANCELED This seminar will provide students with the opportunity to engage in a discussion of the rule of law and how to make sense of it in their daily lives in light of the various theoretical perspectives and doctrines of law. Frequently, law is viewed exclusively to be what lawyers and judges do and what law students study, but its enduring presence in our lives is often not thought about. The very building in which a student is taking a class is governed by legal codes. If a student stopped at the library to copy some research material, copyright laws are involved. If a student made a purchase prior to class, liability laws and contract laws are involved, and so forth. The interaction of the individual with the rule of law is not limited to domestic and national laws, it also extends to international law. In analyzing the individual’s interaction with the rule of law, this seminar will introduce students to the classical and contemporary perspectives of law and society. Students will then apply the concepts, theories and doctrines of law that they have learned to the various daily domestic and international interactions they have with the rule of law in all aspects of their social, economic and political lives.
SOCI 0004-302 The Law in our Lives Hocine Fetni M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This seminar will provide students with the opportunity to engage in a discussion of the rule of law and how to make sense of it in their daily lives in light of the various theoretical perspectives and doctrines of law. Frequently, law is viewed exclusively to be what lawyers and judges do and what law students study, but its enduring presence in our lives is often not thought about. The very building in which a student is taking a class is governed by legal codes. If a student stopped at the library to copy some research material, copyright laws are involved. If a student made a purchase prior to class, liability laws and contract laws are involved, and so forth. The interaction of the individual with the rule of law is not limited to domestic and national laws, it also extends to international law. In analyzing the individual’s interaction with the rule of law, this seminar will introduce students to the classical and contemporary perspectives of law and society. Students will then apply the concepts, theories and doctrines of law that they have learned to the various daily domestic and international interactions they have with the rule of law in all aspects of their social, economic and political lives. Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 0006-301 Anxious Times: Social Change and Fear Jason S Schnittker CANCELED Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders in the US. Although over the last 150 years many have proclaimed to be entering an abrupt new age of anxiety, the prevalence of anxiety appears to have been increasing steadily over time. Anxiety is also treated more frequently by physicians, suggesting it is taken more seriously as an illness. This class will explore the rise of anxiety as the signature 21st century disorder. We will focus on how scientists have understood anxiety; its place relative to other psychiatric symptoms and disorders, such as depression; and what social factors have increased its prevalence. Along the way we will discuss the evolutionary dimensions of anxiety, as well as public beliefs about anxiety and its cultural significance.
SOCI 0006-302 Anxious Times: Social Change and Fear Jason S Schnittker MWF 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders in the US. Although over the last 150 years many have proclaimed to be entering an abrupt new age of anxiety, the prevalence of anxiety appears to have been increasing steadily over time. Anxiety is also treated more frequently by physicians, suggesting it is taken more seriously as an illness. This class will explore the rise of anxiety as the signature 21st century disorder. We will focus on how scientists have understood anxiety; its place relative to other psychiatric symptoms and disorders, such as depression; and what social factors have increased its prevalence. Along the way we will discuss the evolutionary dimensions of anxiety, as well as public beliefs about anxiety and its cultural significance. Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 0010-001 Modern Families: Society and the Changing American Family Paula W Fomby CANCELED The purpose of this course is to understand the American family as a contemporary social institution. We begin by asking how families define themselves. Who counts as a family member, who decides, and how has the definition of family changed over time? We then uncover the work that families do to sustain themselves. How do families negotiate and carry out time-intensive activities like paid work, childrearing, caregiving, housework, emotional labor, self-care, and community involvement? We explore how social institutions like employers, schools, and government challenge or enable families to succeed in this work. Finally, we focus on inequalities between families. How do families absorb the gendered, racialized, and socioeconomic inequalities that permeate American society, and how do they push back? https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SOCI0010001
SOCI 0010-301 Modern Families: Society and the Changing American Family Paula W Fomby MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The purpose of this course is to understand the American family as a contemporary social institution. We begin by asking how families define themselves. Who counts as a family member, who decides, and how has the definition of family changed over time? We then uncover the work that families do to sustain themselves. How do families negotiate and carry out time-intensive activities like paid work, childrearing, caregiving, housework, emotional labor, self-care, and community involvement? We explore how social institutions like employers, schools, and government challenge or enable families to succeed in this work. Finally, we focus on inequalities between families. How do families absorb the gendered, racialized, and socioeconomic inequalities that permeate American society, and how do they push back? Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SOCI0010301
SOCI 0270-401 The Immigrant City Domenic Vitiello M 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This course focuses on immigrant communities in United States cities and suburbs. We survey migration and community experiences among a broad range of ethnic groups in different city and suburban neighborhoods. Class readings, discussions, and visits to Philadelphia neighborhoods explore themes including labor markets, commerce, housing, civil society, racial and ethnic relations, integration, refugee resettlement, and local, state, and national immigration policies. The class introduces students to a variety of social science approaches to studying social groups and neighborhoods, including readings in sociology, geography, anthropology, social history, and political science. Ultimately, the class aims to help students develop: 1) a broad knowledge of immigration and its impacts on U.S. cities and regions; 2) a comparative understanding of diverse migrant and receiving communities; and 3) familiarity with policies and institutions that seek to influence immigration and immigrant communities. LALS0270401, URBS0270401 Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SOCI0270401
SOCI 1000-401 Introduction to Sociology Benjamin J Shestakofsky MW 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000401 Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SOCI1000401
SOCI 1000-402 Recitation - Intro to Sociology R 8:30 AM-9:29 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000402 Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 1000-403 Recitation - Intro to Sociology R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000403 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 1000-404 Recitation - Intro to Sociology R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000404 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 1000-405 Recitation - Intro to Sociology R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000405 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 1000-406 Recitation - Intro to Sociology F 8:30 AM-9:29 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000406 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 1000-407 Recitation - Intro to Sociology F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000407 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 1000-408 Recitation - Intro to Sociology R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000408 Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 1000-409 Recitation - Intro to Sociology R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000409 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 1000-410 Recitation - Intro to Sociology R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000410 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 1000-411 Recitation - Intro to Sociology R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000411 Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 1000-601 Introduction to Sociology W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000601 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SOCI1000601
SOCI 1010-401 The Family Pilar Gonalons-Pons MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Family life is deeply personal but at the same time is dramatically impacted by social forces outside of the family. In this course we will examine how families are organized along the lines of gender, sexuality, social class, and race and how these affect family life. We will consider how family life is continually changing while at the same time traditional gender roles persist. For example, how "greedy" workplaces, which require long work hours, create work-family conflicts for mothers and fathers. We will also examine diverse family forms including single-parent families, blended families, families headed by same-gender parents, and families headed by gender non-conforming parents. The lectures will also examine how economic inequality shapes family life. Students will have the opportunity to apply key concepts to daily life. GSWS1011401 Society Sector
SOCI 1050-001 Social Stratification Annette Lareau T 3:30 PM-6:29 PM In this course we study the current levels and historical trends of inequality in the United States especially in cross-national comparative perspective. We discuss causes and consequences of inequality as well as various policy efforts to deal with inequality. Topics include intergenerational social mobility, income inequality, education, gender, race and ethnicity among others. Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SOCI1050001
SOCI 1051-001 Class Matters: Poverty, Prosperity, and the American Dream Regina S Baker T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM Despite the United States being “the land of opportunity,” economic inequality is at an all-time high. The gap between the poorest and richest Americans continues to widen. Intergenerational social mobility continues to decline, and the “American Dream” of economic prosperity is becoming increasingly difficult to attain. So, who is rich and who is poor? How are income and wealth distributed in America? What are the causes and implications of this distribution? In this course, we will answer these questions from a sociological perspective. In the process, students will gain a fuller understanding of social class and how it relates to various domains such as family life, housing, education, employment, healthcare, and the legal system.
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 1070-401 Media and Popular Culture David I Grazian MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS1170401 Society Sector
SOCI 1070-402 Recitation- Media and Popular Culture R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS1170403 Society Sector
SOCI 1070-403 Recitation- Media and Popular Culture R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS1170404 Society Sector
SOCI 1070-404 Recitation- Media and Popular Culture R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS1170406 Society Sector
SOCI 1070-405 Recitation- Media and Popular Culture R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS1170407 Society Sector
SOCI 1111-401 Mental Illness Jason S Schnittker MWF 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is designed to give a general overview of how sociologists study mental illness. We will be concerned with describing the contributions of sociological research and exploring how these contributions differ from those of psychology, psychiatry, and social work. This overview will be done in three parts: we will discuss (i) what "mental illness" is, (ii) precisely how many Americans are mentally ill, (iii) how social factors (e.g. race, gender, class) and social arrangements (e.g. social networks) lead to mental illness, and (iv) how we as a society respond to and treat the mentally ill. Throughout the course, we will be concerned with uncovering the assumptions behind different definitions of mental health and exploring their political, social, and legal implications. HSOC1312401
SOCI 1150-401 Sociology of Housing Lance M Freeman M 10:15 AM-1:14 PM This course introduces students to the variegated roles of housing in society and has three broad aims. First, the roles of housing as shelter, locus of community, financial asset, and determinant of political power and representation will be described and explored in detail. Second, the way the different functions of housing serve to create and reinforce social stratification is explored. Finally, the function and role of public policy in housing will also be examined. URBS1155401
SOCI 2000-401 Sociological Research Methods Courtney E Boen MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC2002401 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2000-402 Recitation - Sociological Research Methods Zohra Ansari-Thomas R 8:30 AM-9:29 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC2002402 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2000-403 Recitation - Sociological Research Methods Zohra Ansari-Thomas R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC2002403 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2000-404 Recitation - Sociological Research Methods Ashleigh I Cartwright R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC2002404 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2000-405 Recitation - Sociological Research Methods Ashleigh I Cartwright F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC2002405 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2010-401 Social Statistics Pilar Gonalons-Pons MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC2010401 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2010-402 Recitation - Social Statistics Kai Feng This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC2010402 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2010-403 Recitation - Social Statistics Hashim Mustanir Tirmizi This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC2010403 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2010-404 Recitation - Social Statistics Kai Feng This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC2010404 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2010-405 Recitation - Social Statistics Hashim Mustanir Tirmizi This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC2010405 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2220-401 Health of Populations Irma Elo MW 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC2202401 Quantitative Data Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SOCI2220401
SOCI 2220-402 Recitation - Health of Populations R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC2202402 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2220-403 Recitation - Health of Populations R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC2202403 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2240-401 Law and Social Change Hocine Fetni TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM Beginning with discussion of various perspectives on social change and law, this course then examines in detail the interdependent relationship between changes in legal and societal institutions. Emphasis will be placed on (1) how and when law can be an instrument for social change, and (2) how and when social change can cause legal change. In the assessment of this relationship, emphasis will be on the laws of the United States. However, laws of other countries and international law relevant to civil liberties, economic, social and political progress will be studied. Throughout the course, discussions will include legal controversies relevant to social change such as issues of race, gender and the law. Other issues relevanat to State-Building and development will discussed. A comparative framework will be used in the analysis of this interdependent relationship between law and social change. AFRC2240401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 2430-401 Race, Science & Justice Joao V Nery Fiocchi Rodrigues CANCELED What is the role of the life and social sciences in shaping our understanding of race? How has racial stratification influenced scientists and how have scientists constructed racial difference and helped to maintain or contest racial inequities? How have these racial theories shaped the production of scientific knowledge and the way we think about human bodies, diversity, and commonality—and what are the consequences for justice in our society? This course draws on an interdisciplinary body of biological and social scientific literature to explore critically the connections between race, science, and justice in the United States, including scientific theories of racial inequality, from the eighteenth century to the genomic age. After investigating varying concepts of race, as well as their uses in eugenics, criminology, anthropology, sociology, neuroscience, medicine, and public health, we will focus on the recent expansion of genomic research and technologies that treat race as a biological category that can be identified at the molecular level, including race-specific pharmaceuticals, commercial ancestry testing, and racial profiling with DNA forensics. We will discuss the significance of scientific investigations of racial difference for advancing racial justice in the United States. AFRC2430401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 2610-401 Latinos in the United States Emilio Alberto Parrado CANCELED This course presents a broad overview of the Latino population in the United States that focuses on the economic and sociological aspects of Latino immigration and assimilation. Topics to be covered include: construction of Latino identity, the history of U.S. Latino immigration, Latino family patterns and household structure, Latino educational attainment. Latino incorporation into the U.S. labor force, earnings and economic well-being among Latino-origin groups, assimilation and the second generation. The course will stress the importance of understanding Latinos within the overall system of race and ethnic relations in the U.S., as well as in comparison with previous immigration flows, particularly from Europe. We will pay particular attention to the economic impact of Latino immigration on both the U.S. receiving and Latin American sending communities, and the efficacy and future possibilities of U.S. immigration policy. Within all of these diverse topics, we will stress the heterogeneity of the Latino population according to national origin groups (i.e. Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Latinos), as well as generational differences between immigrants and the native born. LALS2610401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 2610-402 Latinos in the United States Emilio Alberto Parrado MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course presents a broad overview of the Latino population in the United States that focuses on the economic and sociological aspects of Latino immigration and assimilation. Topics to be covered include: construction of Latino identity, the history of U.S. Latino immigration, Latino family patterns and household structure, Latino educational attainment. Latino incorporation into the U.S. labor force, earnings and economic well-being among Latino-origin groups, assimilation and the second generation. The course will stress the importance of understanding Latinos within the overall system of race and ethnic relations in the U.S., as well as in comparison with previous immigration flows, particularly from Europe. We will pay particular attention to the economic impact of Latino immigration on both the U.S. receiving and Latin American sending communities, and the efficacy and future possibilities of U.S. immigration policy. Within all of these diverse topics, we will stress the heterogeneity of the Latino population according to national origin groups (i.e. Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Latinos), as well as generational differences between immigrants and the native born. LALS2610402 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 2640-401 Media Culture & Society in Contemporary China Guobin Yang TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course covers Chinese media, culture, and society from the 1970s to the present. It examines the causes and consequences of social and institutional transformation, with an emphasis on civic engagement, cultural change, and the impact of digital media. In analyzing these developments, the course pays special attention to historical contexts and draws on concepts and theories from sociology, communication, and related fields. The course helps students develop nuanced and sophisticated approaches to the understanding of contemporary Chinese media, culture, and society and cross-cultural phenomena more broadly. COMM2640401 Cross Cultural Analysis
SOCI 2680-401 Contemporary Immigration in the U.S. Robert G Gonzales T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM While this course will engage immigration issues more broadly, we will centrally focus on questions of immigrant incorporation and the effects of U.S immigration policy. We will start with the broad question of what should be done about the estimated 10.5 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States. Then, we will take a deeper look at the ways in which macro-level forces such as our laws and institutions shape the micro-level, everyday lives of undocumented immigrants and those living in mixed-status families. We will pay close attention to the circumstances of young people, including their experiences of exclusion and belonging across social and educational contexts. More specifically, we will examine how these factors might affect young people's development, schooling experiences, academic trajectories and aspirations, assimilation and ethnic identity, family dynamics, civic engagement, and employment. LALS2680401, LALS5680401, SOCI5680401
SOCI 2700-401 Current Issues in Contemporary Japan T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM In this course, we aim to understand what social issues in Japanese society exist and how
they occur. Japan had experienced rapid industrial and economic developments until the 1980s. The Japanese systems of education, labor markets, and social security, which have continued until today, were established by this period approximately. Although people at that time were suffered from problems like harsh entrance examinations for secondary and higher educations, long working hours after they started a job, and gender inequality, they accepted these problems in exchange for their economic flourishment.
EALC1759401, SOCI5690401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SOCI2700401
SOCI 2905-401 Everyday Life in Africa Adewale Adebanwi MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course will explore the different dimensions of everyday life in Africa. Everyday life has been described by Agnes Heller (1978) as “the secret yeast of history.” What constitutes this “yeast of history” in contemporary Africa? In exploring everyday life, we will examine the existing (in)capacities in the structures of state and society in Africa for human well-being in relation to the differences between political life (bios) and bare life (zoe). The course engages with the everyday life in terms of how social, economic, and political lives are constituted and the implications of this process for whether Africans live well or not, how they die, and their struggles for alternative lives. With (ethnographic) accounts and perspectives from different countries in Africa, the course focuses deeply on how to understand and explain the conditions under which everyday social needs and economic necessities are turned into political/existential struggles as well as the conditions under which political exigencies can transform into economic, social and bodily fatalities. The overarching questions that will animate this course include these: What are the prevalent conditions of everyday life in Africa? What and who determines (in)eligibility regarding the everyday tools of good life and human survival? How are these determinations related to the differential distribution of potential and/or actual injury, harm, and damage to human life and the conditions of its survival? What can ethnographic insight contribute to our understanding of everydayness in Africa? The roles of sexualities, gender, generation, humor, identities, racism, hate, memory, memorial, transactions, etc., in the construction, reconstruction, and deconstruction of daily life – and death – in the continent will be examined. Audio-visual materials will be used to analyze important themes about quotidian life in Africa. AFRC2762401, ANTH2762401
SOCI 2907-401 Race, Rights and Rebellion Keisha-Khan Perry CANCELED This course provides an in-depth examination of theories of race and different kinds of social struggles for freedom around the globe. We will critically engage the latest scholarship from a variety of scholars and social movement actors. From anti-slavery revolts to struggles for independence to anti-apartheid movements, this course will emphasize how racialized peoples have employed notions of rights and societal resources grounded in cultural differences. Though much of the readings will highlight the experiences of African descendant peoples in Africa and its diaspora, the course will also explore the intersections of Black struggles with social movements organized by indigenous peoples in the Americas. Students will also have the unique experience of accessing readings primarily written by primarily Black scholars, some of
whom have participated as key actors in the social movements they describe. Key concepts include power, resistance, subaltern, hegemony, identity politics, consciousness, and intellectual activism.
The course will be organized around the following objectives:
1. To explore a range of contemporary theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches to the
study of social movements;
2. To focus on the relationship between race, gender, class, culture, and politics in the African diaspora;
3. To study the historical development of organized struggles, social protests, uprisings, revolutions,
insurgencies, and rebellions;
4. To examine the political agency of African descendant peoples in the global struggle for liberation and citizenship.
AFRC3515401, ANTH2515401, LALS3515401
SOCI 2921-401 Criminal Justice Maria Cuellar MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course examines how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The course reviews the historical development of criminal justice agencies in the United States and Europe and the available scientific evidence on the effect these agencies have on controlling crime. The course places an emphasis on the functional creation of criminal justice agencies and the discretionary role decision makers in these agencies have in deciding how to enforce criminal laws and whom to punish. Evidence on how society measures crime and the role that each major criminal justice agency plays in controlling crime is examined from the perspective of crime victims, police, prosecutors, jurors, judges, prison officials, probation officers and parole board members. Using the model of social policy evaluation, the course asks students to consider how the results of criminal justice could be more effectively delivered to reduce the social and economic costs of crime. CRIM1100401 Society Sector
SOCI 2932-401 Latinx Cultural History Johnny Irizarry T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of the resiliency and impact of Latinx cultural and artistic contributions, esthetics, expressions and institution building int he United Stats from the Civil Rights Era to the present. We will explore how Latinxs arguculturally defining being "American"; how their artistic expressions fit and influence the creativity and productivity of American and global Arts & Cultural expressions; and the Latinx interactions of race, culture, society, economy and politics in the U.S. LALS4250401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 2940-401 Homelessness & Urban Inequality Dennis P Culhane F 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This first-year seminar examines the homelessness problem from a variety of scientific and policy perspectives. Contemporary homelessness differs significantly from related conditions of destitute poverty during other eras of our nation's history. Advocates, researchers and policymakers have all played key roles in defining the current problem, measuring its prevalence, and designing interventions to reduce it. The first section of this course examines the definitional and measurement issues, and how they affect our understanding of the scale and composition of the problem. Explanations for homelessness have also been varied, and the second part of the course focuses on examining the merits of some of those explanations, and in particular, the role of the affordable housing crisis. The third section of the course focuses on the dynamics of homelessness, combining evidence from ethnographic studies of how people become homeless and experience homelessness, with quantitative research on the patterns of entry and exit from the condition. The final section of the course turns to the approaches taken by policymakers and advocates to address the problem, and considers the efficacy and quandaries associated with various policy strategies. The course concludes by contemplating the future of homelessness research and public policy. AFRC0010401, URBS0010401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 2943-401 Global Urban Education Alec Ian Gershberg W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course examines the demographic, social, and economic trends impacting the growth of global cities--providing the context for global urban education. Through the dual lens of globalization and local urban culture, we explore relationships between urban education and economic development, democratic citizenship, social movements, social inclusion, equity, and quality of urban life. We consider key historical legacies (e.g., Colonialism), informal settlements and "slums," the rise of the "knowledge economy", and the role of international aid. Additional topics include: early childhood; gender equity; youth culture; impacts of crisis and war; urban refugees; teacher training and identity; accountability & governance; information & computer technology; religion, indigenous cultures, and language identity; & the role of the private sector and school choice. We focus on cities like Sao Paolo, Mexico City, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Ho Chi Minh City, Johannesburg, Lagos, Nairobi, Jakarta, Mumbai, Lahore, Tehran, and Cairo, and draw comparisons to cities like New York, London, Paris and Tokyo. URBS2580401 Cross Cultural Analysis
SOCI 2970-401 Social Inequalities: Caste and Race Rupali Bansode TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course introduces students to two systems of inequity, caste in South Asia, particularly in India, and race in the United States. It’s main objective is to demonstrate how these modes of inequity, sometimes dismissed as outdated or irrelevant, continue to shape social and state institutions like family, law, and bureaucracy. The course will explore sociological literature on caste and race and examine how these systems existed in a range of historical contexts. It will examine how certain groups were recipients of economic, political, and social privilege, and how these groups othered communities such as Afro-Americans in the United States and Dalits in India. We will consider how privileged groups continue to represent modern institutions like state and law that fail to protect disadvantaged communities in both India and the United States. The course will also explore how privileged communities employ the tool of gendered violence of different kinds like physical violence against men and sexual violence against women of Afro-American communities and Dalit communities to maintain forms of social power and control. The final unit of the course will deal with the emerging and imagined solidarities between Afro-American social and political movements in the United States and Dalit movements in India. AFRC2219401, GSWS2219401, SAST2219401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SOCI2970401
SOCI 2971-401 Bioethics Elizabeth Hallowell TR 8:30 AM-9:29 AM This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamental principles of bioethics and the many ethical issues that arise in the rapidly changing fields of biomedicine and the life sciences. The first half of the course will provide an overview of the standard philosophical principles of bioethics, using clinical case studies to help illustrate and work through these principles. In the second half of the course we will focus on recent biomedical topics that have engendered much public controversy including diagnostic genetics, reproductive technologies and prenatal screening, abortion, physician assisted suicide, human experiments, and end of life decision making. We will use the principles learned in the first half of the course to systematically think through these bioethical issues, many of which affect our everyday lives. HSOC1330401
SOCI 2971-402 Bioethics F 8:30 AM-9:29 AM This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamental principles of bioethics and the many ethical issues that arise in the rapidly changing fields of biomedicine and the life sciences. The first half of the course will provide an overview of the standard philosophical principles of bioethics, using clinical case studies to help illustrate and work through these principles. In the second half of the course we will focus on recent biomedical topics that have engendered much public controversy including diagnostic genetics, reproductive technologies and prenatal screening, abortion, physician assisted suicide, human experiments, and end of life decision making. We will use the principles learned in the first half of the course to systematically think through these bioethical issues, many of which affect our everyday lives. HSOC1330402
SOCI 2971-403 Bioethics F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamental principles of bioethics and the many ethical issues that arise in the rapidly changing fields of biomedicine and the life sciences. The first half of the course will provide an overview of the standard philosophical principles of bioethics, using clinical case studies to help illustrate and work through these principles. In the second half of the course we will focus on recent biomedical topics that have engendered much public controversy including diagnostic genetics, reproductive technologies and prenatal screening, abortion, physician assisted suicide, human experiments, and end of life decision making. We will use the principles learned in the first half of the course to systematically think through these bioethical issues, many of which affect our everyday lives. HSOC1330403
SOCI 2971-404 Bioethics F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamental principles of bioethics and the many ethical issues that arise in the rapidly changing fields of biomedicine and the life sciences. The first half of the course will provide an overview of the standard philosophical principles of bioethics, using clinical case studies to help illustrate and work through these principles. In the second half of the course we will focus on recent biomedical topics that have engendered much public controversy including diagnostic genetics, reproductive technologies and prenatal screening, abortion, physician assisted suicide, human experiments, and end of life decision making. We will use the principles learned in the first half of the course to systematically think through these bioethical issues, many of which affect our everyday lives. HSOC1330404
SOCI 2971-405 Bioethics F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamental principles of bioethics and the many ethical issues that arise in the rapidly changing fields of biomedicine and the life sciences. The first half of the course will provide an overview of the standard philosophical principles of bioethics, using clinical case studies to help illustrate and work through these principles. In the second half of the course we will focus on recent biomedical topics that have engendered much public controversy including diagnostic genetics, reproductive technologies and prenatal screening, abortion, physician assisted suicide, human experiments, and end of life decision making. We will use the principles learned in the first half of the course to systematically think through these bioethical issues, many of which affect our everyday lives. HSOC1330405
SOCI 2973-401 Culture on Trial: Race, Media & Intellectual Property Joseph M Coppola TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course explores the US intellectual property regime’s impact on the production, distribution and consumption of media and art. By the end of the class, students will come away with historical, theoretical, and practical understandings of how media technology changes the law and how the law has subsequently responded to changes in media technology. This course is affiliated with CWIC (Communication Within the Curriculum). See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. CIMS2935401, ENGL2935401
SOCI 2974-401 Adivasis/Indigenous Peoples & British Colonialism in India Bhangya Bhukya MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Modern Western colonialism impacted the world in many ways. However, each country and community has had a different encounter and experience with colonialism. For the Adivasis (indigenous peoples) of India, it was catastrophic and marked a new phase in their history. The pre-colonial symbolizes a period of freedom in the hills and forest, whereas the colonial era symbolizes state coercion, eviction from land and the end of free movement in the forest. The proposed course discusses Adivasis' encounters with the British colonial state. The course examines Indian history from the perspectives of Adivasis and contrasts these with dominant paradigms of Indian history. In this way, the course allows students to understand India from a different perspective.
Under British colonialism, the diverse ethnic self-governing communities were imagined as primitive, uncivilized, barbaric, violent, backward and childlike people. The course discusses how such constructions impacted Adivasi social life and development. It traces how the expansion of the colonial state in forests and hills put an end to self-rule and induced massive migration from the plains of India and asks how Adivasi areas were integrated into the colonial economy. How did the colonial state use revenue and forest policies and regulations to bring these areas under its control? How did commercialization of agriculture and forest conservation work to further marginalize Adivasis? The course also examines how Adivasi knowledge of cultivation and forest conservation were viewed by the colonial state and asks why the colonial state encouraged caste-Hindu peasant migration into Adivasi areas. Finally, it traces the ways that colonial intervention has resulted in a series of contestations, acts of resistance, and insurgencies by Adivasi groups? Tracing forms of Adivasi resistance, the course puts these into conversation with intellectual history, emphasizing the role of rumours, myths, and orality, which provided the basis for the new insurgent consciousness that spread throughout Adivasi communities.
Adivasi resistance movements have been documented and analyzed by colonial rulers and anthropologists. Colonial discourses were successful in criminalizing Adivasi politics. Ironically, many colonial-era discourses concerning Adivasis have been perpetuated within the post-colonial academy. The anti-colonial struggles of Adivasis were constructed as sporadic, spontaneous, unorganized and apolitical. The inauguration of the Subaltern Studies Project has reversed such arguments and attempted to provide ideological integrity to Adivasi politics. Students will be introduced to important literature on Adivasi anti-colonial insurgent consciousness and will be encouraged to think critically about the concepts and theories of subaltern politics. Assigned readings include texts by James Scott, Ranajit Guha, David Arnold, David Hardiman, Ajay Skaria, Dhanagare, Ramachandra Guha, Biswamoy Pati, Alpa Shah, Crispin Bates, Jangkhomang Guite and Bhangya Bhukya. One aim of the course is to sensitize the students to how the political and cultural mobilizations by subalterns have contributed to the shaping of democracy.
ANTH2109401, ANTH5239401, HIST0853401, SAST2239401, SAST5239401
SOCI 2977-401 Just Futures Seminar I: Making Race and Ethnicity in the Americas Belén Unzueta W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This seminar analyzes the historical construction of race and ethnicity in the Americas. Using a sociological framework, the seminar explores racial and ethnic classificatory practices and their institutionalization throughout the continent. We will pay particular attention to the transformation of land tenure and labor regimes and how different political economies produced different logics of racialization. The focus of the seminar in the Americas as a unit, including both North and South America, and the Caribbean, from the 15th century to the present. The readings in this seminar come from a wide range of disciplines, including sociology, anthropology, history, political science, settler colonial studies, and law. LALS2977401
SOCI 4100-301 Thesis Workshop I Chenoa A Flippen The purpose of this course is to guide senior sociology majors in writing a research proposal for a senior honors thesis. Students will learn about various research approaches, how to write a focused literature review, and kinds of data necessary to answer a wide variety of research questions, including their own. Throughout the course, students will work on designing a research question, generation researchable hypotheses, and coming up with a design for their proposed study. The final paper for this course will be a research proposal that is the basis for students' independent research project. This course satisfies the research requirement for sociology majors and is designed primarily for seniors who are planning to write an honors thesis. Perm Needed From Department
SOCI 5351-401 Quantitative Methods II Xi Song MT 10:15 AM-11:14 AM As the second part of a two-semester sequence, this graduate course focuses on regression analysis as used in social science research. In particular, we discuss features and assumptions of linear regression and logistic regression models. We learn how to apply regression models to real social science data using Stata and how to interpret the results. DEMG5351401
SOCI 5351-402 Recitation - Quantitative Methods II R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM As the second part of a two-semester sequence, this graduate course focuses on regression analysis as used in social science research. In particular, we discuss features and assumptions of linear regression and logistic regression models. We learn how to apply regression models to real social science data using Stata and how to interpret the results. DEMG5351402
SOCI 5351-403 Recitation - Quantitative Methods II R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM As the second part of a two-semester sequence, this graduate course focuses on regression analysis as used in social science research. In particular, we discuss features and assumptions of linear regression and logistic regression models. We learn how to apply regression models to real social science data using Stata and how to interpret the results. DEMG5351403
SOCI 5400-401 Discourse Analysis F 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Discourse Analysis examines both verbal and non-verbal communication to explore the making of claims of meaning, truthfulness, and authority, in everything from political speech to advertising to scientific reports. The course presents a range of methods and theoretical frameworks for analyzing discourse in a wide variety of social contexts (journalistic, legal, political, medical, familial). Readings and exercises draw from theories of signs, symbols, gestures, and language to analyze communicative acts and events. The goal of the course is to provide a solid grounding in the theories of speech, writing, symbols, and images, and to survey a broad array of empirical studies that have grown out of these theoretical frameworks. The course is appropriate for graduate students and advanced undergraduates. COMM5400401
SOCI 5500-301 The Sociology of Poverty Regina S Baker W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This seminar will provide a graduate-level overview of and training in the sociology of poverty. It takes a comparative perspective by examining poverty across different theoretical perspectives, dimensions, and substantive domains as well as across different time periods and place contexts. This course will cover a range of topics pertaining to poverty such as the conceptualization and measurement of poverty, poverty levels and trends, and disparities in poverty. We will study how poverty research has evolved, various theories of the causes of poverty, and the consequences of poverty for individuals and society. We will explore the link between poverty and place, including poverty within urban, suburban, and rural contexts and across different sub-national units (e.g. regions, states, neighborhoods). While we will focus much attention to poverty in the U.S., we will also examine poverty across rich democracies and in less developed countries to gain a better understanding of global poverty and its broader impact. We will also explore how poverty is produced and maintained through various domains such as the family, education, the labor market, housing, the criminal justice system, and the welfare state. Finally, we will assess the effectiveness of poverty policies as well as other anti-poverty strategies. Throughout the course, we will use an intersectional lens that considers the roles of race/ethnicity, gender, age, and other axes of inequality in the perpetuation of poverty. By the end of this course, students will be able to draw on different perspectives and methodological approaches to critically discuss poverty and issues pertaining to poverty. Course requirements include weekly readings, class participation, critical responses, and a research paper.
SOCI 5680-401 Contemporary Immigration in the U.S. Robert G Gonzales T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM While this course will engage immigration issues more broadly, we will centrally focus on questions of immigrant incorporation and the effects of U.S immigration policy. We will start with the broad question of what should be done about the estimated 10.5 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States. Then, we will take a deeper look at the ways in which macro-level forces such as our laws and institutions shape the micro-level, everyday lives of undocumented immigrants and those living in mixed-status families. We will pay close attention to the circumstances of young people, including their experiences of exclusion and belonging across social and educational contexts. More specifically, we will examine how these factors might affect young people's development, schooling experiences, academic trajectories and aspirations, assimilation and ethnic identity, family dynamics, civic engagement, and employment. LALS2680401, LALS5680401, SOCI2680401
SOCI 5690-401 Current Issues in Contemporary Japan T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM In this course, we aim to understand what social issues in Japanese society exist and how
they occur. Japan had experienced rapid industrial and economic developments until the 1980s. The Japanese systems of education, labor markets, and social security, which have continued until today, were established by this period approximately. Although people at that time were suffered from problems like harsh entrance examinations for secondary and higher educations, long working hours after they started a job, and gender inequality, they accepted these problems in exchange for their economic flourishment.
EALC1759401, SOCI2700401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SOCI5690401
SOCI 6040-401 Methodology of Social Research Melissa J Wilde W 8:30 AM-11:29 AM This course will give students familiarity with the common research methods social scientists use to conduct research. Ethnographic, interview, survey, experimental and historical/comparative research methods will be covered. Four themes will be explored: 1) the basics of solid research design, 2) the various advantages and disadvantages of each method, 3) when the use of a method is appropriate or inappropriate for the research question, and 4) how to evaluate researchers' claims on the basis of the evidence they present. These themes will be explored by reading examples of and conducting exercises designed to give students hands-on experience in each of the methods. Students will conduct the exercises on a topic of their choice, which together will culminate in their final paper. DEMG6040401
SOCI 6200-301 Sociological Research II Wendy Roth T 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This course is intended to aid in the selection, framing, writing and revising of sociological dissertation proposals. It is also intended to provide a forum for the presentation of dissertation research in progress. The goal is to provide a forum for the acquisition of professional socialization in sociology. We will discuss the framing of research questions, the design of research strategies, and the writing of dissertation proposals. We will discuss the process of submitting manuscripts for conferences and journals, preparing a curriculum vitae, job search strategies, and preparing for effective colloquium presentations. We will also review articles currently under review at the American Sociological Review. It is expected that third year graduate students in Sociology will enroll in this class.
SOCI 6280-401 Migration and Development Domenic Vitiello W 8:30 AM-11:29 AM International migration is one of the most important phenomena driving urban, community, economic, and human development. This course focuses on the ways that migrants and community, government, and private institutions work to influence development around the world. We explore a range of large- and small-scale economic development, human and community development. After a brief introduction to histories and theories of migration and development, our major themes include: 1) the work of institutions, governments, and private sector firms in sending and receiving nations that influence migration and development; 2) diaspora-led transnational development, including remittances, hometown and country associations, and transnational advocacy and community organizing; and 3) local revitalization, labor and housing markets, workforce and enterprise development in migrant-receiving settings. Readings are drawn from a variety of social sciences, planning and development studies, including from academia and practice. Guests from local and transnational development organizations will visit the class. Assignments include short papers on the readings and a research paper or project designed by each student in consultation with the instructor. Ultimately, the course aims to help students develop: 1) a broad knowledge of migration and development in geographic and institutional settings around the world; 2) an in-depth understanding of community and economic development practices in migrant sending and receiving communities; and 3) familiarity with social science approaches to evaluating the dynamics and impacts of migration and development.
CPLN6280401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SOCI6280401