Colloquium

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series Schedule 2014-2015

Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series Schedule 2014-2015 (PDF)

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series: Monica Prasad, Professor of Sociology, Northwestern University; Fellow, Russell Sage Foundation

"A Demand-Side Theory of Comparative Political Economy"
Location: 
169 McNeil Building
Date: 
Friday, December 4, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series: Kimberly Kay Hoang, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Chicago

“Dealing in Desire: Asian Ascendancy, Western Decline, and the Hidden Currencies of Global Sex Work”
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series: Anthony Ocampo, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Cal Poly Pomona

"The Latinos of Asia: How Filipinos Break the Rules of Race"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

***CANCELED*** Penn Sociology Colloquium Series: Omar Lizardo, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Notre Dame

"Making our way in social space: Exploring the links between cultural categories, social categories and judgments of taste."
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, April 6, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series: Marcelo Suarez-Orozco,Distinguished Professor of Education, UCLA

"The Empire of Suffering: Mass Migration in the Age of Dystopia."
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Marcelo Suárez-Orozco, the UCLA Wasserman Dean, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies and Distinguished Professor of Education, is a psychological anthropologist and a scholar of globalization, migration and education. He is the award-winning author and co-author of multiple volumes published by Harvard University Press, Stanford University Press, University of California Press, Cambridge University Press, inter alia. His scholarly papers, in a range of disciplines and languages, appear in such journals as Harvard Business Review, Harvard Educational Review, Revue Française de Pédagogie (Paris), Cultuur en Migratie (Leuven), Ethos, Daedalus, Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Temas, Cultura, Ideología, Sociedad (Havana, Cuba), Harvard Policy Review and others. He regularly contributes to media outlets including The New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, U.S News and World Report, Boston Globe, The Huffington Post, CNN, NPR, and others. The recipient of the Mexican Order of the Aztec Eagle, he has served as Special Advisor to the Chief Prosecutor, the International Criminal Court and has authored multiple texts for Pope Francis’ Pontifical Academies. At Harvard University, he was the Thomas Professor of Education and Culture, co-founder and co-director of the Harvard Immigration Projects, and Member of the inaugural Executive Committee, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies. At New York University he was the inaugural Ross University Professor of Globalization and Education. In 2009-10 he was the Richard Fisher Member at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. He has been visiting professor at the École des hautes études en sciences sociales (Paris), University of Barcelona and the Catholic University of Leuven. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Education, he has lectured at the German foreign office, Mexican foreign office, Spanish foreign office, Vatican, U.S. Congress, the Federal Reserve Bank, United Nations, Davos and in multiple other scholarly and policy venues in the Middle East, Europe and Latin America. An immigrant from Argentina, he is a product of the California Master Plan, commencing his studies in community college—where 40 years ago he met Carola Suárez-Orozco, the eminent psychologist and scholar of immigration—and transferring to UC Berkeley where he received his B.A., (Psychology), M.A. (Anthropology), and Ph.D. (Anthropology).

His talk: The world is witnessing a rapid rise in the numbers of a plurality of migrants —involuntary, internal or international, authorized or unauthorized, environmental refugees and victims of human trafficking. These flows have intensified under the ascendancy of globalization, rachitic and collapsing states, war and terror, climate change, and growing inequality. Catastrophic migrations pose new international risks to millions of migrants and challenge the institutions of sending, transit, and receiving nations alike. While immigration is normative, it has taken a dystopic turn. Worldwide, civil and ethnic wars, structural violence, environmental cataclysms, and growing inequality are behind the largest displacement of people since World War II. Of the over 60 million forcefully displaced, half are children. Under the best of circumstances migration generates a psychosocial disequilibrium. This lecture will examine dystopic migrations qua the family in its legislative, social, and symbolic forms.


Penn Sociology Colloquium Series (Sociology Visiting Day): Jessica Calarco, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Indiana University

"Class in the Classroom: Interactions and Inequalities in Elementary School"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

 

Jessica Calarco is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Indiana University. Her research examines how social interactions give rise to social inequalities. She is particularly interested in inequalities that result from interactions between individuals and institutions. Methodologically, her research is primarily ethnographic in nature. Substantively, she focuses on issues related to education, family, culture, children and youth.


"Class in the Classroom: Interactions and Inequalities in Elementary School"


Relevant Readings: 


Description: 

In this talk, Professor Jessica Calarco will show how social class shapes student-teacher interactions and how those interactions contribute to inequalities in school. Drawing on more than two years of observations of middle-class and working-class students in one public elementary school, and on interviews with students, parents, and teachers, Calarco finds that in elementary classrooms, the squeaky wheels get the grease, but those squeaky wheels are rarely the ones that need it most. Rather, the squeakiest wheels are the middle-class children who have been coached by their parents to “be their own advocates” in the classroom. 

Middle-class parents—afraid to be labeled “helicopters,” but equally afraid of leaving their children’s success to chance—teach their children to proactively and persistently seek assistance, accommodations, and attention from their teachers on their own behalf. They urge their children to squeak and squeak loudly, and that coaching prompts middle-class children to try to speak up and stand out in school. Those strategies, in turn, have real rewards in the classroom, generating more support and encouragement from teachers and giving middle-class students a leg-up on their assignments. 

Working-class children, on the other hand, have been coached by their parents to “be respectful of others” in the classroom. Working-class parents—trusting that a “good school” will ensure academic success and afraid that pushy and demanding children will be seen as “troublemakers”—teach their children not to ask for assistance or accommodations or attention from their teachers.  They urge their children to hide the squeak or fix it themselves, and that coaching leads working-class children to try to keep quiet and stand aside in the face of challenges at school. 

Furthermore, when working-class students do try to seek support from their teachers, they do so in ways that are less insistent but also easier for teachers to overlook. As a result, working-class students rarely reap the rewards enjoyed by their middle-class peers. Now, the teachers want very much to meet each student’s needs. Yet, the hectic nature of classroom life, coupled with limited resources and accountability pressures, leads teachers to inadvertently give preference to the squeaky wheels—those students who are most proactive and persistent in their demands.

 

 

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series: ESS Practice Talks

Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series: Darnell Hunt, Professor of Sociology, University of California Los Angeles

"The 2016 Hollywood Diversity Report: Business as Usual in the Business."
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, March 2, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series: Andrew Schrank, Professor of Sociology and International Studies, Brown University

"The Private Roots of Public Regulation in the United States: The Case of the National Consumers League."
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm