Colloquium

Charles Bosk, Professor of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

"Medicine in the Radiant City: Co-Morbidity and its Discontents"
Location: 
286-287 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

 

**Cancelled** Doug McAdam, Professor of Sociology, Stanford University

“The Relationship between Neighborhood Religious and Civic Life in Chicago, 1970-2005”
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Doug McAdam, Professor of Sociology, Stanford University and Visiting Scholar, Russell Sage Foundation

Professor McAdam is currently working on three major research projects. The first is an comprehensive follow-up study of all accepted applicants to the Teach for America (TFA) Program between 1993-1998. The study is primarily interested in assessing the longer-term “civic effects” of the TFA experience. The second project seeks to understand the factors that shape county-level variation in arson attacks on churches in the U.S. between 1996-2001. The specific question of interest is whether a history of racial conflict in the county is related to the burning of African-American churches. Finally, Professor McAdam is collaborating with Professor Rob Sampson (sociology, Harvard) in an ongoing study of neighborhood activism in Chicago between 1970-2005. The goal is to better understand the structural factors and dynamic processes that shape the capacity of neighborhood groups to organize and act on their own behalf.

Renee C. Fox, Professor Emerita, University of Pennsylvania

"Doctors Without Borders: Humanitarian Quests, Impossible Dreams"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Renee C. Fox, Professor Emerita, University of Pennsylvania

Renée C. Fox, a summa cum laude graduate of Smith College in 1949, earned her Ph.D. in Sociology in 1954 from Radcliffe College, Harvard University, where she studied in the Department of Social Relations.

Before joining the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania in 1969, she was a member of the Columbia University Bureau of Applied Social Research, taught for twelve years at Barnard College, and then spent two years as a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Social Relations at Harvard. At the University of Pennsylvania, she was a professor in the Department of Sociology with joint, secondary appointments in the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, and in the School of Nursing; and she held an interdisciplinary chair as the Annenberg Professor of the Social Sciences. From 1972-1978 she was the Chair of the Penn Sociology Department. On July 1, 1998, she became the Annenberg Professor Emerita of the Social Sciences. She is also an Emerita Senior Fellow of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

**Cancelled** Sylvia Hurtado, Professor, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, UCLA

“Minorities in Stem Fields”
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Sylvia Hurtado, Professor of Education, UCLA

Sylvia Hurtado is Professor and Director of the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. Just prior to coming to UCLA, she served as Director of the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education at the University of Michigan. Dr. Hurtado has published numerous articles and books related to her primary interest in student educational outcomes, campus climates, college impact on student development, and diversity in higher education. She has served on numerous editorial boards for journals in education and served on the boards for the American Association of Higher Education (AAHE), the Higher Learning Commission, and is past-President of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE). Black Issues In Higher Education named her among the top 15 influential faculty whose work has had an impact on the academy. She obtained her Ph.D. in Education from UCLA, Ed.M. from Harvard Graduate School of Education, and A.B. from Princeton University in Sociology.

 

 

Michael Sauder, Associate Professor, University of Iowa

"The Unintended Consequences of Medical Measures: The Case of Patient Experience Surveys"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Michael Sauder's research interests include social theory, inequality, and organizations. He is currently examining how the production of educational rankings affects the organizational activities and status systems of higher education. His theoretical work explores how third parties, legitimacy, and ambiguity influence status relationships at both the individual and organizational levels of analysis. His teaching interests include social stratification, social theory, and qualitative methods.

Mark S. Mizruchi, Professor of Sociology, University of Michigan

"The Fracturing of the American Corporate Elite"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Mark S. Mizruchi, Barger Family Professor of Organizational Studies, Professor of Sociology, and Professor of Business Administration at the University of Michigan

A native of Cortland and Syracuse, New York, Mark received his B.A. at Washington University (St. Louis) in 1975 and his Ph.D. at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1980. After several years as a statistical consultant at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, he became Assistant Professor of Sociology at Columbia University in 1987. He was promoted to Associate Professor at Columbia in 1989 and moved to Michigan as Professor in 1991. Mizruchi's research has focused on the economic and political behavior of large American corporations, using the methods of social network analysis. He has also published articles on circadian rhythms of blood minerals in humans, substance abuse among psychiatric inpatients, and two (scholarly) papers on professional basketball teams, one of which was the subject of a story on the sports page of USA Today.

His primary current project is a study of the changing nature of the American corporate elite. He is also studying the globalization of American banking, the determinants of corporate lobbying activities, and the estimation bias in the network autocorrelation model (an approach for measuring the effects of social network ties). His publications include four books, The Fracturing of the American Corporate Elite (Harvard University Press, 2013), The Structure of Corporate Political Action (Harvard University Press, 1992), Intercorporate Relations (co-edited, with Michael Schwartz, Cambridge University Press, 1987), and The American Corporate Network, 1904-1974 (Sage Publications, 1982), and more than 100 articles and reviews. Among Mizruchi's awards are 21 research grants, election to two honorary societies, a fellowship to the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and two excellence in teaching awards from the University of Michigan. In 1988 he became one of the first two sociologists to receive a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation, and in 2011 he received a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

He has served as Associate Editor of Administrative Science Quarterly, Consulting Editor of the American Journal of Sociology, and reviewer for more than 50 scholarly journals, book publishers, and granting agencies. He runs four miles daily and remains a die-hard fan of the Syracuse Orangemen.

Natasha Warikoo, Assistant Professor of Education, Harvard University

"What Merit Means: Admissions, Diversity, and Inequality at Elite Universities in the United States and Britain"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, March 5, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Natasha Warikoo, Assistant Professor of Education, Harvard University

Each of Natasha Warikoo’s projects analyzes the cultural influences on the ways in which groups in society strive for status, and they all lie at the intersection of race, immigration, culture, inequality, and education.Her book, Balancing Acts: Youth Culture in the Global City (University of California Press 2011), analyzes how youth cultures among children of immigrants are related to their orientations toward schooling through ethnographic, interview, and survey data in diverse New York and London high schools. Balancing Acts won the Thomas and Znaneicki Best Book Award from the International Migration Section of the American Sociological Association.

Warikoo will spend the 2013-14 year as a fellow at Russell Sage Foundation, where she will write a book about the perspectives of students attending elite British and American universities on merit in admissions, inequality, and race. This project compares how national contexts, university practices, and race shape students’ meaning-making related to diversity and excellence.

Her work has been published in scholarly journals (American Journal of EducationPoeticsRace, Ethnicity and EducationRacial and Ethnic Studies; and Review of Educational Research), books, and newspapers (Education WeekThe Los Angeles TimesThe Washington Post), and she has won grants and awards from American Sociological Association, the British Academy, the National Science Foundation, the Nuffield Foundation, and Russell Sage Foundation. She completed her Ph.D. in sociology at Harvard University, and previously taught at University of London's School of Advanced Study. Prior to completing her Ph.D. she was a teacher in New York City's public schools for four years.


 

Philip Cohen, Professor of Sociology, University of Maryland

"What Happened to the Gender Revolution?"
Location: 
McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Philip Cohen, Professor of Sociology, University of Maryland

Philip Cohen, Professor of Sociology, has a long-standing research interest in the area of Gender, Family, and Social Change. In particular, he has published extensively on the gender division of labor within families, and between men and women outside of families. In addition to the substantive aspects of this research, he has maintained a strong interest in measurement issues in the area of household and family structure, which has included participating in Counting Couples research conferences at NICHD and consulting with the U.S. Census Bureau on household measurement issues, as well as publishing in demography and sociology journals on these questions.

In the area of Health in Social Context, Cohen has recently done research on questions related to disability and family structure and relationships. This includes work published in Pediatrics on adopted children’s disability rates, and other research on the living arrangements of children with disabilities and their families.

 

Tomas R. Jimenez, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Stanford University

"Rethinking Race and Immigration in an Era of Mass Immigration: Evidence from a High-Skilled Gateway"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Tomas R. Jimenez, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Stanford University

Tomás Jiménez is an assistant professor of sociology at Stanford University. He is also a Fellow at theCenter for Social Cohesion. Professor Jiménez is currently spending a sabbatical year as a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University (CASBS). His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity. His book, Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans,Immigration, and Identity (University of California Press, 2010) draws on interviews and participant observation to understand how uninterrupted Mexican immigration influences the ethnic identity oflater-generation Mexican Americans. The book was recently awarded the American Sociological Association’s Sociology of Latinos/as Section 2011 Distinguished Book Award. Professor Jiménez has also published this research in the American Sociological Review (forthcoming), American Journal of Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Social Science Quarterly, DuBois Review, and the Annual Review of Sociology.

 

Osagie K. Obasogie, Professor of Law, University of California, Hastings

"Blinded by Sight: Seeing Race Through the Eyes of the Blind"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Osagie K. Obasogie, Professor of Law, University of California, Hastings
Recent Interview in the Boston Globe

Professor Obasogie's research attempts to bridge the conceptual and methodological gaps between empirical and doctrinal scholarship on race. This effort can be seen in his recent work that asks: how do blind people understand race? By engaging in qualitative research with individuals who have been totally blind since birth, this project provides an empirical basis from which to rethink core assumptions embedded in social and legal understandings of race. His first article from this project won the Law & Society Association’s John Hope Franklin Prize in addition to being named runner-up for the Distinguished Article Award by the Sociology of Law Section of the American Sociological Association.  This research provides the basis for Professor Obasogie’s first book, Blinded By Sight, which is forthcoming with Stanford University Press.

His scholarship also looks at the past and present roles of science in both constructing racial meanings and explaining racial disparities. This is tied to his interest in bioethics, particularly the social, ethical, and legal implications of reproductive and genetic technologies. Obasogie’s second book, Beyond Bioethics: Towards a New Biopolitics (with Marcy Darnovsky) is currently under contract with the University of California Press.

In addition to his work at Hastings, Professor Obasogie has a joint appointment with the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences and is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Genetics and Society. He is also an affiliated faculty member with the Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholars Program at UCSF and UC Berkeley. Obasogie serves on the Board of Trustees for the Law & Society Association and is on the Steering Committee for the University of California Center for New Racial Studies.