Colloquium

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series Schedule 2014-2015

Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series Schedule 2014-2015 (PDF)

Louis Chauvel,Professor of Sociology, University of Luxembourg [co-sponsored by the Population Studies Center]

"Further on Generational Inequalities and Welfare Regimes: Inter and Intra Birth Cohort Inequalities in Comparative Perspective."
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series Schedule 2014-2015

Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Penn Sociology Colloquium Series Schedule 2014-2015 (PDF)

Aliya Saperstein, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Stanford University [Co-Sponsored with the Penn Program on Race, Science, and Society]

“The Past and Present Significance of Racial Mobility”
Location: 
*LOCATION CHANGE* 286-287 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Professor Saperstein received her B.A. in Sociology from the University of Washington and her Ph.D. in Sociology and Demography from the University of California-Berkeley. In 2014-15, she will be a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation.

Her research focuses on the social processes through which people come to perceive, name and deploy “racial” differences -- in public discourse, academic research and their everyday lives -- and their consequences for explaining, and reinforcing, social inequality. Her current research projects explore several strands of this subject, including:

- The relationship between individual-level racial fluidity and the maintenance of group boundaries, racial stereotypes and hierarchies.
-The implications of methodological decisions, especially the measurement of race and ethnicity in surveys, for studies of stratification and health disparities.


The Past and Present Significance of Racial Mobility

 In this talk, Professor Aliya Saperstein will outline the need for a “racial mobility” perspective, analogous to classic sociological studies of status attainment and class mobility. Evidence for a more dynamic understanding of race and inequality in the United States comes from different historical periods, and is consistent across outcomes and datasets, as well as with the results of controlled experiments. Further progress on the subject requires changes in data collection and research practice, including how we conceptualize reliability and validity in the measurement of race.

Relevant Readings:

Recent Video:

 

 *This event is co-sponsored with the Penn Program on Race, Science and Society

Jennifer Earl, Professor of Sociology, University of Arizona

"Historicizing Explanations of Social Movement Repression: The (In)Stability of Repressive Predictors"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, November 19, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Adam D. Reich, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Columbia University

"Contradictions in the Commodification of Hospital Care (and Other Things)"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Nilda Flores-Gonzalez, Associate Professor, Dept. of Sociology, University of Illinois at Chicago

"Race and Belonging Among Latino Millennials: Latinos as a Racial Middle"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Maria Johnson, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, University of Delaware

"Through Daughters’ Eyes: Race and Gender Ideals in Black Daughter-Father Relationships."
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Criminal Justice [w/courtesy appointments in Sociology and Law], Temple University

"Code of the Courts: Racialized Justice in a Colorblind Era"
Location: 
McNeil Building 103
Date: 
Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

David Brady, Director of Inequality and Social Policy Research Unit, WZB Social Science Research Center *Co-Sponsored with Social Science & Policy Forum*

"Prevalences, Penalties and the Demographic Risks of Poverty"
Location: 
103 McNeil Building
Date: 
Wednesday, November 5, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm