Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
SOCI 001-401 Intro To Sociology Jerry A Jacobs MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002401 Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Permission Needed From Department
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI001401
SOCI 001-402 Introduction To Sociology Olivia Yu He Hu R 08:30 AM-09:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002402 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-403 Introduction To Sociology Olivia Yu He Hu R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002403 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-404 Introduction To Sociology Allison Nicole Dunatchik R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002404 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-405 Introduction To Sociology Allison Nicole Dunatchik R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002405 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-406 Introduction To Sociology Samantha Love F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002406 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-407 Introduction To Sociology Samantha Love F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002407 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-601 Intro To Sociology Yun Cha CANCELED Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002601 Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
SOCI 003-601 Deviance & Soc Control Tyler G Baldor CANCELED A sociological analysis of the origins, development, and reactions surrounding deviance in contemporary society. Topics include labeling theory, stigma, social organization, tradition, social power, crime, sexual deviance, drug use, and racism. Theoretical and methodological issues will be discussed and evaluated. Society Sector
SOCI 004-401 The Family Annette Lareau MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Family life is deeply personal but at the same time is dramatically impacted by social forces outside of the family. In this course we will examine how families are organized along the lines of gender, sexuality, social class, and race and how these affect family life. We will consider how family life is continually changing while at the same time traditional gender roles persist. For example, how "greedy" workplaces, which require long work hours, create work-family conflicts for mothers and fathers. We will also examine diverse family forms including single-parent families, blended families, families headed by same-gender parents, and families headed by gender non-conforming parents. The lectures will also examine how economic inequality shapes family life. Students will have the opportunity to apply key concepts to daily life. GSWS004401, SOCI524401 Society Sector Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI004401
SOCI 012-401 Globalization and Its Historical Significance Brian J Spooner
Mauro Federico Guillen
M 02:00 PM-04:00 PM This course analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH012401, HIST012401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Humanities & Social Science Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI012401
SOCI 012-402 Globalization and Its Historical Significance Tayeba Batool W 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH012402, HIST012402 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI012402
SOCI 012-403 Globalization and Its Historical Significance Tayeba Batool W 02:00 PM-03:00 PM This course analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH012403, HIST012403 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI012403
SOCI 012-404 Globalization and Its Historical Significance Aliyah Michaela Bixby-Driesen W 04:00 PM-05:00 PM This course analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH012404, HIST012404 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI012404
SOCI 012-405 Globalization and Its Historical Significance Jacob H Nussbaum W 05:00 PM-06:00 PM This course analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH012405, HIST012405 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI012405
SOCI 012-406 Globalization and Its Historical Significance Jacob H Nussbaum R 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH012406, HIST012406 Cross Cultural Analysis Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI012406
SOCI 012-407 Globalization and Its Historical Significance Joan Michele Ryan R 06:00 AM-07:00 AM This course analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH012407, HIST012407 Cross Cultural Analysis Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI012407
SOCI 012-408 Globalization and Its Historical Significance Aliyah Michaela Bixby-Driesen F 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This course analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH012408, HIST012408 Cross Cultural Analysis Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI012408
SOCI 012-409 Globalization and Its Historical Significance Joan Michele Ryan R 07:00 AM-08:00 AM This course analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH012409, HIST012409 Cross Cultural Analysis Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI012409
SOCI 013-401 Homelessness & Urban Inequality Dennis P. Culhane F 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This freshman seminar examines the homelessness problem from a variety of scientific and policy perspectives. Contemporary homelessness differs significantly from related conditions of destitute poverty during other eras of our nation's history. Advocates, researchers and policymakers have all played key roles in defining the current problem, measuring its prevalence, and designing interventions to reduce it. The first section of this course examines the definitional and measurement issues, and how they affect our understanding of the scale and composition of the problem. Explanations for homelessness have also been varied, and the second part of the course focuses on examining the merits of some of those explanations, and in particular, the role of the affordable housing crisis. The third section of the course focuses on the dynamics of homelessness, combining evidence from ethnographic studies of how people become homeless and experience homelessness, with quantitative research on the patterns of entry and exit from the condition. The final section of the course turns to the approaches taken by policymakers and advocates to address the problem, and considers the efficacy and quandaries associated with various policy strategies. The course concludes by contemplating the future of homelessness research and public policy. AFRC041401, URBS010401 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI013401
SOCI 041-301 East Asian Societies Hyunjoon Park M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI041301
SOCI 041-303 The Future of Work Benjamin J Shestakofsky M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Course is available to Freshmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI041303
SOCI 041-304 Diversity, Technology and the Penn Experience Janice A Curington MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Freshman Seminar
SOCI 041-305 Sociology of Race and Ethnicity Wendy Roth MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Cultural Diversity in the US Permission Needed From Instructor
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI041305
SOCI 041-306 Mistakes, Accidents and Disasters Charles Bosk CANCELED Course is available to Freshmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI041306
SOCI 100-401 Intro Soc Research Melissa J. Wilde W 11:00 AM-12:00 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI100401
SOCI 100-402 Sociological Research Methods Austin Lee R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100402 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-403 Sociological Research Methods Austin Lee R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100403 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-404 Sociological Research Methods Elena Gayle Van Stee F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100404 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-405 Sociological Research Methods Elena Gayle Van Stee F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100405 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-406 Sociological Research Methods Hannah Elizabeth Olson W 07:00 PM-08:00 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100406 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-407 Sociological Research Methods Hannah Elizabeth Olson F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100407 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 103-401 Asian Amer in Contemp So: Asian Americans in Contemporary Society Vani S Kulkarni TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This class will introduce you to sociological research of Asian Americans and engage in the "model minority" stereotype. We begin by a brief introduction to U.S. immigration history and sociological theories about assimilation and racial stratification. The class will also cover research on racial and ethnic identity, educational stratification, mass media images, interracial marriage, multiracials, transracial adoption, and the viability of an Asian American panethnic identity. We will also examine the similarities and differences of Asian Americans relative to other minority groups. ASAM001401 Society Sector Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI103401
SOCI 110-301 The Rich and the Poor Regina S Baker T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Who is rich? Who is poor? This course examines how wealth and income are distributed in the United States, and how its distribution affects individuals, groups, institutions, and society. We will gain a fuller understanding of what social class is and discuss how it affects all aspects of life, including: quality of schooling, access to employment, child rearing, and even tastes, preferences, and identity. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI110301
SOCI 117-301 Sociology of Work Robin Lisa Leidner TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The material world is shaped and maintained through work, but so is the social world. How work is organized, allocated, and rewarded determines the opportunities people have for developing their own capacities, the kinds of ties they will have with others, and how much control they will have over their own lives. We will consider various sociological perspectives on work and compare alternative ways of organizing work, with a focus on the contemporary United States. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI117301
SOCI 120-401 Social Statistics Michel Guillot MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI120401
SOCI 120-402 Social Statistics Yezhen Li R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120402 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-403 Social Statistics Yezhen Li R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120403 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-404 Social Statistics Yasmin Amira Mertehikian F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120404 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-405 Social Statistics Yasmin Amira Mertehikian F 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120405 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 125-301 Sociological Theory Jerry A Jacobs R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course will cover the founding classics of the sociological tradition including works of Tocqueville, Marx and Engels, Weber, Durkheim, Mauss, Simmel, and G.H.Mead. We will also examine how the major traditions have continued and transformed into theories of conflict, domination, resistance and social change; social solidarity, ritual and symbolism; symbolic interactionist and phenomenological theory of discourse, self and mind. This course satisfies the theory requirement for sociology majors. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI125301
SOCI 128-401 Basic Demog Methods Michel Guillot MCNB 150 M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course provides an introduction to basic demographic concepts, data, indicators, and techniques. The course emphasizes hands-on applications of techniques in the analysis of population dynamics in the U.S. and elsewhere. Students will learn about the main sources of demographic data, including censuses, surveys, and vital statistics, and methods to estimate demographic processes (e.g. mortality, fertility). Students will leave the course with a solid grounding in a) the sources and limitations of demographic data; b) the construction of basic demographic indicators; and c) appropriate use of basic demographic techniques to answer questions about human populations. SOCI609401, DEMG609401 Course Online & In-Person Options,Synchronous https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI128401
SOCI 135-601 Law & Society Hocine Fetni T 06:30 PM-09:30 PM After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings included research reports, statutes and cases. AFRC135601 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI135601
SOCI 152-401 American Health Policy Andria B. Johnson TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This lecture course will introduce students to a broad range of topics that fall under the heading of American health policy. Its main emphasis will be on the history of health care in America from the U.S. Civil War to Obamacare. The primary objective of the course will be to consider why the U.S., until very recently, remained one of the only industrialized nations to have a private, non-nationalized health care system. Some of the themes addressed include: private health insurance(such as Blue Cross/Blue Shield), industrial health and workmen's compensation, the welfare state (in Europe, Canada, and the U.S.), women's health, especially maternal and infant care programs, Medicare/Medicaid, the Clinton Health Plan of 1993, injured soldiers and the Veterans Administration. HSOC150401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI152401
SOCI 152-402 American Health Policy Cameron Marcus Brinitzer F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This lecture course will introduce students to a broad range of topics that fall under the heading of American health policy. Its main emphasis will be on the history of health care in America from the U.S. Civil War to Obamacare. The primary objective of the course will be to consider why the U.S., until very recently, remained one of the only industrialized nations to have a private, non-nationalized health care system. Some of the themes addressed include: private health insurance(such as Blue Cross/Blue Shield), industrial health and workmen's compensation, the welfare state (in Europe, Canada, and the U.S.), women's health, especially maternal and infant care programs, Medicare/Medicaid, the Clinton Health Plan of 1993, injured soldiers and the Veterans Administration. HSOC150402 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 152-403 American Health Policy Cameron Marcus Brinitzer F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This lecture course will introduce students to a broad range of topics that fall under the heading of American health policy. Its main emphasis will be on the history of health care in America from the U.S. Civil War to Obamacare. The primary objective of the course will be to consider why the U.S., until very recently, remained one of the only industrialized nations to have a private, non-nationalized health care system. Some of the themes addressed include: private health insurance(such as Blue Cross/Blue Shield), industrial health and workmen's compensation, the welfare state (in Europe, Canada, and the U.S.), women's health, especially maternal and infant care programs, Medicare/Medicaid, the Clinton Health Plan of 1993, injured soldiers and the Veterans Administration. HSOC150403 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 175-401 Medical Sociology Jason S Schnittker This course will give the student an introduction to the sociological study of medicine. Medical sociology is a broad field, covering topics as diverse as the institution and profession of medicine, the practice of medical care, and the social factors that contribute to sickness and well-being. Although we will not explore everything, we will attempt to cover as much of the field as possible through four thematic units: (1) the organization and development of the profession of medicine, (2) the delivery of health-care, especially doctor-patient interaction, (3) the social and cultural factors that affect how illness is defined, and (4) the social causes of illness. The class will emphasize empirical research especially but not only quantitative research. HSOC275401 Society Sector Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI175401
SOCI 222-301 Ethnography Annette Lareau CANCELED This course is designed to introduce students to field methods in sociological research, with a focus on participant-observation and interviewing. During this course, students will read original research based on field methods and discuss their strengths, limitations, and ethical dilemmas. Most importantly, students will design their own research projects and become ethnographers and interviewers. Students will be guided through the fieldwork process from data collection to analysis, and will turn in multiple assignments and original research paper. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI222301
SOCI 233-401 Criminology Charles E Loeffler MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This introductory course examines the multi-disciplinary science of law-making, law-breaking, and law-enforcing. It reviews theories explaining where, when, by whom and against whom crimes happen. Police, courts, prisons, and other institutions are also critically examined. This course meets the general distribution requirement. CRIM100401 Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI233401
SOCI 235-401 Law and Social Change Hocine Fetni TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM Beginning with discussion of various perspectives on social change and law, this course then examines in detail the interdependent relationship between changes in legal and societal institutions. Emphasis will be placed on (1) how and when law can be an instrument for social change, and (2) how and when social change can cause legal change. In the assessment of this relationship, emphasis will be on the laws of the United States. However, laws of other countries and international law relevant to civil liberties, economic, social and political progress will be studied. Throughout the course, discussions will include legal controversies relevant to social change such as issues of race, gender and the law. Other issues relevanat to State-Building and development will discussed. A comparative framework will be used in the analysis of this interdependent relationship between law and social change. AFRC235401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI235401
SOCI 239-301 Sociology of Religion Melissa J. Wilde CANCELED How do the many religious institutions in our society differ, and what common qualities do they share? Why do some religious institutions adapt to modernity while others do not? In particular, why are the politics of sex and gender so fundamental to the current organization of the American religious landscape? These questions will be the central motivating questions for the semester. The course will begin with an introduction to current theories in the sociology of religion. We will then apply and critique those theories as we learn more about the histories, members, practices and beliefs of all the major religious groups in the US today, including Mainline, Fundamentalist and Evangelical Protestantism, Roman Catholicism, Judaism, and other groups such as the Seventh Day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses and Mormons. Students will pick two religious groups (one liberal and one conservative) to observe over the course of the semester and will write papers comparing and contrasting the two groups.
SOCI 258-401 Global Urban Education Alec Ian Gershberg W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course examines the demographic, social, and economic trends impacting the growth of global cities--providing the context for global urban education. Through the dual lens of globalization and local urban culture, we explore relationships between urban education and economic development, democratic citizenship, social movements, social inclusion, equity, and quality of urban life. We consider key historical legacies (e.g., Colonialism), informal settlements and "slums," the rise of the "knowledge economy", and the role of international aid. Additional topics include: early childhood; gender equity; youth culture; impacts of crisis and war; urban refugees; teacher training and identity; accountability & governance; information & computer technology; religion, indigenous cultures, and language identity; & the role of the private sector and school choice. We focus on cities like Sao Paolo, Mexico City, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Ho Chi Minh City, Johannesburg, Lagos, Nairobi, Jakarta, Mumbai, Lahore, Tehran, and Cairo, and draw comparisons to cities like New York, London, Paris and Tokyo. URBS258401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI258401
SOCI 264-401 Poverty,Race and Health Courtney E Boen W 03:30 PM-04:30 PM This course is designed to introduce students to current literature on race/ethnic difference in health and mortality in the United States, covering such topics as explanations for why some race/ethnic groups fare better than others, how inner city poverty and residential segregation may contribute to racial/ethnic differences in health outcomes, and health of immigrants versus native-born populations. Current policy debated and recent policy developments related to health are also briefly discussed. The course is organized as a seminar with a combination of lectures and class discussions. URBS264401, SOCI564401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI264401
SOCI 301-301 Thesis Workshop II Chenoa A. Flippen This is the second part of the Thesis Workshop course. Prerequisite: SOCI 300. Permission must be granted by the department. Non-Majors Need Permission From Department
Permission Needed From Department
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Majors Only
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI301301
SOCI 303-301 Soc Inequal and Health: Social Inequality and Health Courtney E Boen F 03:30 PM-04:30 PM Eat well. Exercise regularly. Get 7-9 hours of sleep. We have all been bombarded with this type of advice for achiev- ing and maintaining optimal health. But how are our health behaviors and outcomes shaped, influenced, and con- strained by social factors? How does where we live influence how - and how long - we live? And how do racism, gender inequality, and other forms of social exclusion, oppression, and domination impact health and well-being? This course provides an introduction into how social forces, broadly, and social inequality, specifically, impact individual and population health. We will begin by learning about how health is more than the product of individual lifestyle choices and genetic factors by exploring the social determinants of health. We will then examine how social inequality - particularly along lines of race, immigration status, social class, and gender - contributes to population health differences. We will analyze how racism, gender inequality, and other forms of social stratification both shape access to health promoting resources and opportunities such as well-paying jobs and healthy and affordable foods and also pattern exposure to harmful stressors and toxins such as discrimination and violence. Finally, we will discuss and debate policy and programmatic approaches aimed at reducing population health disparities. In this course, we will examine concepts related to social inequality and health through a process called "active learning," which involves activities such as watching and reacting to films, reading about and responding to current events, and active dialogues and debates with classmates. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI303301
SOCI 338-401 Exhibiting Black Bodies Tukufu Zuberi T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course concerns the exhibiting of Black Bodies in Museums and gallery spaces. We will trace the evolution of public history from the "Cabinets of Curiosity" in 18th and 19th Century Europe, through to the current institutional confirmation of the vindications traditions represented by Museu Afro Brasil (Sao Paulo, Brazil), National Museum of African American History and Culture (Washington,D.C.), and the Museum of Black Civilization (Dakar, Senegal). We will give particular attention to "why these representations at these times in these places?." In the process of addressing these questions we will give voice to the figures who conceived the curatorial content from those with the colonial mentality, to those with the abolitiionist and nationalist and Pan-African visions. AFRC620401, AFRC338401, SOCI660401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI338401
SOCI 339-401 Demography of Race Tukufu Zuberi W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM This course will examine demographic and statistical methods used to capture the impact of racial stratification in society. This course covers the skills and insights used by demographers and social statisticians in the study of racial data. A key challenge facing researchers is the interpretation of the vast amount of racial data generated by society. As these data do not directly answer important social questions, data analysis and statistics must be used to interpret them. The course will examine the logic used to communicate statistical results from racial data in various societies. We will question the scientific claims of social science methodology by extending the critical perspective to biases that may underlie research methods. We will discuss good and bad practices within the context of the historical developments of the methods. SOCI632401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI339401
SOCI 344-401 Soci of Climate Emergenc Daniel A Cohen W 02:30 PM-04:00 PM We're in the midst of a climate emergency, with climate change the most pressing problem. We need to transform our social and economic system to avoid the worst. There's still time to do this, while establishing the conditions for us, and our descendants, to live brilliant, stimulating lives. To move forward, we need to supplement natural science with social science. In the course, will ask, how did we get into this ecological crisis? How does climate figure in contemporary politics? How do the climate and water crises intersect with inequalities around the world? How does an ongoing revolution in the energy sector reflect these tendencies, and what is its promise? What are the big competing paradigms for positive, transformative change today? This seminar will tackle these vast questions by introducing students to a range of novel social perspectives on the contemporary global environmental crisis - a crisis that is usually otherwise represented in coldly scientific terms or according to cliches about environmentalists. SOCI544401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI344401
SOCI 377-401 International Migration Chenoa A. Flippen T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM A comprehensive review of theories and research on international migration. The course introduces the basic precepts of neoclassical economics, the new economics of labor migration, segmented labor market theory, world systems theory, social capital theory and the theory of cumulative causation. Readings examine patterns and processes of global migration during the classic age from 1800-1914 as well as during the postwar period from 1945 to the present. The course also covers a history and evaluation of immigration policies around the world, and devotes signification attention to theoretical and empirical perspectives on immigrant adaptation. Within this larger topic, we will also discuss internal migration and urbanization; the relationship between gender and migration; the spatial distribution of immigrants within the United States, immigrant communities, and ethnic enclaves; and the undocumented population in the United States. DEMG677401, SOCI677401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI377401
SOCI 420-401 Perspectives On Urban Poverty Robert P Fairbanks W 05:30 PM-08:30 PM This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to 20th century urban poverty, and 20th century urban poverty knowledge. In addition to providing an historical overview of American poverty, the course is primarily concerned with the ways in which historical, cultural, political, racial, social, spatial/geographical, and economic forces have either shaped or been left out of contemporary debates on urban poverty. Of great importance, the course will evaluate competing analytic trends in the social sciences and their respective implications in terms of the question of what can be known about urban poverty in the contexts of social policy and practice, academic research, and the broader social imaginary. We will critically analyze a wide body of literature that theorizes and explains urban poverty. Course readings span the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, urban studies, history, and social welfare. Primacy will be granted to critical analysis and deconstruction of course texts, particularly with regard to the ways in which poverty knowledge creates, sustains, and constricts meaningful channels of action in urban poverty policy and practice interventions. URBS420401, HIST440401 Cultural Diversity in the US Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI420401
SOCI 424-401 Latinx Communities and the Role of Cbo's in Social Change Johnny Irizarry W 05:30 PM-08:30 PM The purpose of this course to create a Latino Studies/Service Learning ABCS course that cultivates dialogue and knowledge about the social, political, cultural and historical complexities of the Latinx experience in the United States (Philadelphia in particular) and the roles Latinx CBO's play in meeting the needs of Latinx communities and in impacting social change. LALS424401 Cultural Diversity in the US An Academically Based Community Serv Course
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI424401
SOCI 524-401 The Family Annette Lareau MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Family life is deeply personal but at the same time is dramatically impacted by social forces outside of the family. In this course we will examine how families are organized along the lines of gender, sexuality, social class, and race and how these affect family life. We will consider how family life is continually changing while at the same time traditional gender roles persist. For example, how "greedy" workplaces, which require long work hours, create work-family conflicts for mothers and fathers. We will also examine diverse family forms including single-parent families, blended families, families headed by same-gender parents, and families headed by gender non-conforming parents. The lectures will also examine how economic inequality shapes family life. Students will have the opportunity to apply key concepts to daily life. GSWS004401, SOCI004401 For PhD Students Only
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI524401
SOCI 535-401 Quantitative Methods I Hans-Peter Kohler TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is an introduction to the practice of statistics in social and behavioral sciences. It is open to beginning graduate students and--with the permission of the instructor--advanced undergraduates. Topics covered include the description of social science data, in graphical and non-graphical form; correlation and other forms of association, including cross-tabulation; bivariate regression; an introduction to probability theory; the logic of sampling; the logic of statistical inference and significance tests. There is a lecture twice weekly and a mandatory "lab." CRIM536401, DEMG535401 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI535401
SOCI 535-402 Quantitative Methods in Sociology I Taylor Renee Heath W 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is an introduction to the practice of statistics in social and behavioral sciences. It is open to beginning graduate students and--with the permission of the instructor--advanced undergraduates. Topics covered include the description of social science data, in graphical and non-graphical form; correlation and other forms of association, including cross-tabulation; bivariate regression; an introduction to probability theory; the logic of sampling; the logic of statistical inference and significance tests. There is a lecture twice weekly and a mandatory "lab." DEMG535402 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 535-403 Quantitative Methods in Sociology I Taylor Renee Heath W 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course is an introduction to the practice of statistics in social and behavioral sciences. It is open to beginning graduate students and--with the permission of the instructor--advanced undergraduates. Topics covered include the description of social science data, in graphical and non-graphical form; correlation and other forms of association, including cross-tabulation; bivariate regression; an introduction to probability theory; the logic of sampling; the logic of statistical inference and significance tests. There is a lecture twice weekly and a mandatory "lab." DEMG535403 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 535-404 Quantitative Methods in Sociology I W 05:00 PM-06:00 PM This course is an introduction to the practice of statistics in social and behavioral sciences. It is open to beginning graduate students and--with the permission of the instructor--advanced undergraduates. Topics covered include the description of social science data, in graphical and non-graphical form; correlation and other forms of association, including cross-tabulation; bivariate regression; an introduction to probability theory; the logic of sampling; the logic of statistical inference and significance tests. There is a lecture twice weekly and a mandatory "lab." CRIM536404, DEMG535404 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 544-401 Soci of Climate Emergenc Daniel A Cohen W 02:30 PM-04:00 PM We're in the midst of a climate emergency, with climate change the most pressing problem. We need to transform our social and economic system to avoid the worst. There's still time to do this, while establishing the conditions for us, and our descendants, to live brilliant, stimulating lives. To move forward, we need to supplement natural science with social science. In the course, will ask, how did we get into this ecological crisis? How does climate figure in contemporary politics? How do the climate and water crises intersect with inequalities around the world? How does an ongoing revolution in the energy sector reflect these tendencies, and what is its promise? What are the big competing paradigms for positive, transformative change today? This seminar will tackle these vast questions by introducing students to a range of novel social perspectives on the contemporary global environmental crisis--a crisis that is usually otherwise represented in coldly scientific terms or according to cliches about environmentalists. SOCI344401 For PhD Students Only
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI544401
SOCI 553-301 Field Meth. Social Res Benjamin J Shestakofsky CANCELED This course is designed to introduce graduate students to basic skills and concepts in ethnographic field research, including participant observation, interviewing, field documentation, and the scholarly presentation of qualitative data. Students will learn to apply these skills and concepts through an assigned set of exercises in concert with a semester-long project based on intensive fieldwork at a research site of their choosing. In addition, we will examine exemplars of published fieldwork in both classical and contemporary sociology. Students outside of the Department of Sociology need permission of the instructor to enroll.
SOCI 555-301 Professionalization Sem Jason S Schnittker R 02:00 PM-05:00 PM In the non-credit seminar students will be introduce to key areas in sociological research, and a set of professional skills necessary to navigate graduate school and a successful academic career. Students will also be introduced to faculty and resources available at Penn. This course is required for all first-year graduate students in Sociology Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
SOCI 564-401 Poverty,Race and Health Courtney E Boen W 03:30 PM-04:30 PM This course is designed to introduce students to current literature on race/ethnic difference in health and mortality in the United States, covering such topics as explanations for why some race/ethnic groups fare better than others, how inner city poverty and residential segregation may contribute to racial/ethnic differences in health outcomes, and health of immigrants versus native-born populations. Current policy debated and recent policy developments related to health are also briefly discussed. The course is organized as a seminar with a combination of lectures and class discussions. URBS264401, SOCI264401 For PhD Students Only
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI564401
SOCI 596-301 Sociology of Education Emily Hannum M 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This graduate seminar will introduce students to some of the key theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of education. We will examine how schools work to maintain or alleviate inequality, and focus on differences in educational achievement and attainment by race, ethnicity, immigrant status, class, and gender. We will review work on the educational experiences of youth from early childhood to young adulthood. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI596301
SOCI 602-301 Classical Soci Theory: Classical Sociological Theory David I Grazian W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the classical foundations of sociology by drawing on canonical readings by Marx, Engels, Durkheim, Weber, Du Bois, Addams, Simmel, Park, and Goffman, among others. We will read these texts in the context of three major sociological themes: work and social inequality, culture and social structure, and urban interaction and culture in the city. Final papers will require students to draw on classical sociological works in their analyses of contemporary empirical research in sociology. For PhD Students Only
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Majors Only
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI602301
SOCI 605-401 Data Analytics in R Greg Ridgeway TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course covers the tools and techniques to acquire, organize, link and visualize complex data in order to answer questions about crime and the criminal justice system. The course is organized around key questions about police shootings, victimization rates, identifying crime hotspots, calculating the cost of crime, and finding out what happens to crime when it rains. On the way to answer these questions, the course will cover topics including data sources, basic programming techniques, SQL, regular expressions, webscraping, and working with geographic data. The course will use R, an open-source, object oriented scripting language with a large set of available add-on packages. CRIM402401, CRIM602401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
SOCI 609-401 Basic Demog Methods Michel Guillot MCNB 150 M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course provides an introduction to basic demographic concepts, data, indicators, and techniques. The course emphasizes hands-on applications of techniques in the analysis of population dynamics in the U.S. and elsewhere. Students will learn about the main sources of demographic data, including censuses, surveys, and vital statistics, and methods to estimate demographic processes (e.g. mortality, fertility). Students will leave the course with a solid grounding in a) the sources and limitations of demographic data; b) the construction of basic demographic indicators; and c) appropriate use of basic demographic techniques to answer questions about human populations. SOCI128401, DEMG609401 For PhD Students Only
Course Online & In-Person Options,Synchronous
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI609401
SOCI 631-301 Soci of Mistakes & Error Charles Bosk CANCELED The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of some rather ubiquitous social phenomena: mistakes, errors, accidents, and disasters. We will look at these phenomena across institutional domains: aviation, nuclear power plants, and medicine. Our goal is to understand how organizations "think" about unexpected and often tragically spectacular failure; how they develop strategies of prevention; how these strategies of prevention create new vulnerabilities to different sorts of mishaps; how organizations respond when things do go awry; and how they plan for disasters. At the same time, we will be concerned with tensions that inhere in our socially shared perspectives for understanding accidents, errors, mistakes, and disasters at the organizational level and at the level of the individual. Mistakes and errors are frequently the cause of accidents and disasters. The source of mistakes and error are embedded in organizational complexities that are inevitable given the limited cognitive limitations of human operators. As such, they are no one's fault--systems break apart. However, as we seek explanations for these adverse events, we search for convenient scapegoats to blame and to punish. As a society, we often feel a need to hold someone responsible and accountable. We will explore throughout the semester the tension that exists between efforts to understand adverse events as the result of flawed organizational processes versus one that sees these events as a result of the flawed actions of hapless human operators.
SOCI 632-401 Demography of Race Tukufu Zuberi W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM This course will examine demographic and statistical methods used to capture the impact of racial stratification in society. This course covers the skills and insights used by demographers and social statisticians in the study of racial data. A key challenge facing researchers is the interpretation of the vast amount of racial data generated by society. As these data do not directly answer important social questions, data analysis and statistics must be used to interpret them. The course will examine the logic used to communicate statistical results from racial data in various societies. We will question the scientific claims of social science methodology by extending the critical perspective to biases that may underlie research methods. We will discuss good and bad practices within the context of the historical developments of the methods. SOCI339401 For PhD Students Only
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI632401
SOCI 660-401 Exhibiting Black Bodies Tukufu Zuberi T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course concerns the exhbiting of Black Bodies in Museums and gallery spaces. We will trace the evolution of public history from the "Cabinets of Curiosity" in 18th and 19th Century Europe, through to the current institutional confirmation of the vindications traditions represented by Museu Afro Brasil (Sao Paulo, Brazil), National Museum of African American History and Culture (Washington,D.C.), and the Museum of Black Civilization (Dakar, Senegal). We will give particular attention to "why these representations at these times in these places?." In the process of addressing these questions we will give voice to the figures who conceived the curatorial content from those with the colonial mentality, to those with the abolitiionist and nationalist and Pan-African visions. AFRC620401, AFRC338401, SOCI338401 For PhD Students Only
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI660401
SOCI 662-401 Panel Data Analysis Xi Song R 03:00 PM-06:00 PM This course focuses on the ability to use, analyze, and understand panel data. Panel data contain repeated measurements of the dependent variable for the same individuals, and possibly repeated measurements of the predictor variables as well. Panel data offer important opportunities for controlling unobserved variables and for answering questions about causal ordering. DEMG662401, CRIM662401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI662401
SOCI 677-401 International Migration Chenoa A. Flippen T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM A comprehensive review of theories and research on international migration. The course introduces the basic precepts of neoclassical economics, the new economics of labor migration, segmented labor market theory, world systems theory, social capital theory and the theory of cumulative causation. Readings examine patterns and processes of global migration during the classic age from 1800-1914 as well as during the postwar period from 1945 to the present. The course also covers a history and evaluation of immigration policies around the world, and devotes signification attention to theoretical and empirical perspectives on immigrant adaptation. Within this larger topic, we will also discuss internal migration and urbanization; the relationship between gender and migration; the spatial distribution of immigrants within the United States, immigrant communities, and ethnic enclaves; and the undocumented population in the United States. DEMG677401, SOCI377401 For PhD Students Only
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI677401
SOCI 707-401 Second-Year Research Seminar I Melissa J. Wilde T 09:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is intended to hone the skills and judgment in order to conduct independent research in sociology and demography. We will discuss the selection of intellectually strategic research questions and practical research designs. Students will get experience with proposal writing, the process of editing successive drafts of manuscripts, and the oral presentation of work in progress as well as finished research projects. The course is designed to be the context in which master's papers and second year research papers are written. This is a required course for second year graduate students in Demography. Others interested in enrolling in only one of the courses may do so with the permission of the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography. DEMG707401 For PhD Students Only
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Majors Only
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI707401
SOCI 881-401 The Performance Society: Readings in Social and Media Theories Guobin Yang R 01:00 PM-03:00 PM Social action has a performative character - people act as if on a stage in response to audience expectations, whether offline or online. This seminar traces the history of this line of critical thought from Weber and Bakhtin through Goffman and Victor Turner to contemporary authors such as Judith Butler, Byung-Chul Han, Jon McKenzie, and Charles Tilly. Special attention will be devoted to the relationship between media and performance, examined through recent work by media scholars and sociologists such as Ben Agger, Jeffrey Alexander, Jeffrey Berry, Danah Boyd, Alice Marwick, and Sarah Sobieraj. A central issue concerns the will to perform. Why are individuals in modern society compelled to perform? What are the manifestations and forms of performance in institutional and non-institutional politics (such as revolutions and social movements)? How are performances related to emotion? How do the internet and digital media shape the forms and meanings of performance? What are the consequences of the performance imperative? A term paper is required. COMM881401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=SOCI881401