Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
SOCI 0001-401 Poverty and Inequality Regina S Baker T 10:15 AM-1:14 PM What does it mean to live in poverty in the "land of plenty" and experience inequality in the "land of opportunity?" This First-Year Seminar explores these questions and others related to poverty and inequality in contemporary America. The first part of this course focuses on poverty. We will examine topics such as poverty perceptions and measurement, poverty trends, causes of poverty, poverty-related outcomes, and anti poverty policy. The second part of this course focuses on inequality more broadly. We will examine how inequality is defined and what it looks like in the U.S. We will compare the “Haves" and the "Have Nots” and discuss social class, mobility, wealth, and privilege. Lastly, we will explore how different domains (e.g. education, the labor market, health, the justice system) produce, maintain, and reproduce inequalities. Throughout the semester, we will consider the roles of race/ethnicity, gender, age, and place, and how they help deepen our understanding of poverty and inequality. URBS0005401
SOCI 0003-301 Sociology of Race and Ethnicity Wendy Roth MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course will provide a foundation on the sociological perspectives of race and ethnicity in the United States. It begins by developing a working definition of race and ethnicity and examining racial categorization in the U.S. The first part of the course examines major themes including racial and ethnic identity, assimilation of immigrants, immigrants’ legal status, forms of racism and bias, white privilege, and intersectionality. The second part of the class focuses on race and social stratification, examining discrimination, wealth inequality, residential segregation, educational stratification, mass incarceration, and health. We will also discuss why COVID-19 has disproportionately affected minority communities, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the future of racial stratification. Students will examine policies that have perpetuated racial and ethnic inequality as well as those that attempt to ameliorate it.
SOCI 0008-001 Work and Careers in the 21st Century - First Year Seminar Jerry A Jacobs R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The premise of the class is that the workplace is undergoing major transformations that may well generate jobs, careers and organizations quite different from those currently in place. Many interrelated changes are underway, including: globalization, the information and internet revolutions, the diffusion of monitoring and evaluation systems, the mechanization and automation of many jobs and industries, the prospect of working remotely and the growing diversity of the labor force. These changes can be best understood by studying contemporary developments along with placing these changes in an historical perspective. By examining how the theory and practice of work have evolved over the last century and a half, we will be in a better position to understand the changes already in progress and those that may transform work and the workplace over the course of your careers.
SOCI 0009-301 Diversity, Technology and the Penn Experience Janice A Curington MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Penn is diverse in many ways. Let us explore this diversity together and understand its subtleties. How has the word “diversity” evolved over the years? Why is it (at times) such a loaded concept? When, where and how does diversity change within various contexts? What does the concept mean in a university context? How might it change in the future? We will explore different constructions of diversity at Penn. Have new technologies changed the ways in which we perceive culture, communicate and share ideas? Increasingly, we construct notions of ourselves and of others using video and social media in addition to personal experiences. How do such technologies define who we are, and the boundaries we draw to define “us” and “them”? Do sub-cultures thrive now in new ways? How does each student’s journey to Penn bring in new perspectives on the university? Reflections on personal experiences in the context of theories (cultural capital, social capital) will be a core part of this seminar. Readings and research assignments are interdisciplinary and will require critical analysis of both classic and contemporary perspectives. In addition to other assignments, small weekly response papers are due before each class meeting to encourage engaged discussions Society Sector
SOCI 1000-401 Introduction to Sociology Benjamin J Shestakofsky MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000401 Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 1000-402 Introduction to Sociology R 8:30 AM-9:29 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000402 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 1000-403 Introduction to Sociology R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000403 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 1000-404 Introduction to Sociology R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000404 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 1000-405 Introduction to Sociology R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000405 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Society Sector
SOCI 1000-406 Introduction to Sociology F 8:30 AM-9:29 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000406 Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 1000-407 Introduction to Sociology F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000407 Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 1000-601 Introduction to Sociology Zohra Ansari-Thomas MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC1000601 Society Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 1010-401 The Family Annette Lareau CANCELED Family life is deeply personal but at the same time is dramatically impacted by social forces outside of the family. In this course we will examine how families are organized along the lines of gender, sexuality, social class, and race and how these affect family life. We will consider how family life is continually changing while at the same time traditional gender roles persist. For example, how "greedy" workplaces, which require long work hours, create work-family conflicts for mothers and fathers. We will also examine diverse family forms including single-parent families, blended families, families headed by same-gender parents, and families headed by gender non-conforming parents. The lectures will also examine how economic inequality shapes family life. Students will have the opportunity to apply key concepts to daily life. GSWS1011401 Society Sector
SOCI 1040-401 Population and Society Emilio Alberto Parrado MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The course serves as an introduction to the study of population and demography, including issues pertaining to fertility, mortality, migration, and family formation and structure. Within these broad areas we consider the social, economic, and political implications of current trends, including: population explosion, baby bust, the impact of international migration on receiving societies, population aging, racial classification, growing diversity in household composition and family structure, population and environmental degradation, and the link between population and development/poverty. GSWS1042401 Society Sector
SOCI 1060-401 Race and Ethnic Relations Tukufu Zuberi TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM The course will focus on race and ethnicity in the United States. We begin with a brief history of racial categorization and immigration to the U.S. The course continues by examining a number of topics including racial and ethnic identity, interracial and interethnic friendships and marriage, racial attitudes, mass media images, residential segregation, educational stratification, and labor market outcomes. The course will include discussions of African Americans, Whites, Hispanics, Asian Americans and multiracials. AFRC1060401, ASAM1510401, LALS1060401, URBS1060401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 1090-401 Urban Sociology Alec Ian Gershberg TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course is a comprehensive introduction to the sociological study of urban areas. This includes more general topics as the rise of cities and theories urbanism, as well as more specific areas of inquiry, including American urbanism, segregation, urban poverty, suburbanization and sprawl, neighborhoods and crime, and immigrant ghettos. The course will also devote significant attention to globalization and the process of urbanization in less developed counties. AFRC1090401, LALS1090401, URBS1090401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 1100-401 Sociology of Gender Robin Lisa Leidner CANCELED Gender is an organizing principle of society, shaping social structures, cultural understandings, processes of interaction, and identities in ways that have profound consequences. It affects every aspect of people's lives, from their intimate relationships to their participation in work, family, government, and other social institutions and their place in the stratification system. Yet gender is such a taken for granted basis for differences among people that it can be hard to see the underlying social structures and cultural forces that reinforce or weaken the social boundaries that define gender. Differences in behavior, power, and experience are often seen as the result of biological imperatives or of individual choice. A sociological view of gender, in contrast, emphasizes how gender is socially constructed and how structural constraints limit choice. This course examines how differences based on gender are created and sustained, with particular attention to how other important bases of personal identity and social inequality--race and class-interact with patterns of gender relations. We will also seek to understand how social change happens and how gender inequality might be reduced. GSWS1101401 Society Sector
SOCI 1110-401 Medical Sociology Jason S Schnittker MWF 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course will give the student an introduction to the sociological study of medicine. Medical sociology is a broad field, covering topics as diverse as the institution and profession of medicine, the practice of medical care, and the social factors that contribute to sickness and well-being. Although we will not explore everything, we will attempt to cover as much of the field as possible through four thematic units: (1) the organization and development of the profession of medicine, (2) the delivery of health-care, especially doctor-patient interaction, (3) the social and cultural factors that affect how illness is defined, and (4) the social causes of illness. The class will emphasize empirical research especially but not only quantitative research. HSOC1222401 Society Sector
SOCI 1120-401 Law and Society Hocine Fetni TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM After introducing students to the major theoretical concepts concerning law and society, significant controversial societal issues that deal with law and the legal systems both domestically and internationally will be examined. Class discussions will focus on issues involving civil liberties, the organization of courts, legislatures, the legal profession and administrative agencies. Although the focus will be on law in the United States, law and society in other countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America will be covered in a comparative context. Readings included research reports, statutes and cases. AFRC1123401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 2000-401 Sociological Research Methods Tessa D Huttenlocher MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC2002401 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2000-402 Sociological Research Methods R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC2002402 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2000-403 Sociological Research Methods R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC2002403 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2000-404 Sociological Research Methods CANCELED One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC2002404 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2000-405 Sociological Research Methods CANCELED One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC2002405 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2010-401 Social Statistics Michel Guillot MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC2010401 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2010-402 Social Statistics This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC2010402 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2010-403 Social Statistics This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC2010403 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2010-404 Social Statistics This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC2010404 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2010-405 Social Statistics This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC2010405 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2220-401 Health of Populations Hans-Peter Kohler MW 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC2202401 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2220-402 Health of Populations R 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC2202402 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2220-403 Health of Populations F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC2202403 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOCI 2281-401 Demography of Education Hyunjoon Park T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The proposed course will be open to undergraduate and graduate students with different assignments to each of undergraduate and graduate students. The major topic of the course is the impacts of education, especially college education, on various kinds of family behavior such as dating, cohabitation, living arrangements, marriage, fertility, parenting, divorce, and remarriage. In many countries, some family behaviors, if not all, are increasingly differentiated between college-educated and non-college-educated. For instance, increase in divorce is more evident among the less educated than their more educated counterparts, while marriage decline is more substantial among the less educated. Although parents’ time and money investments in children’s education have generally increased over time for both college-educated and non-college-educated parents, the increase is much more substantial among college-educated parents than their non-college-educated counterparts, leading to divergence. In such societies, college education has increasingly differentiated population with respect to family behavior, which has important implications for inequality of children’s well-being. Of course, such diverging family behavior is not observed every society. In some countries, educational differentiation in family behavior is minimal.
In this course, students first will be able to have a global perspective on education and family behavior by reviewing empirical evidence of the relationship between education and various kinds of family behavior across a variety of countries. After learning how different measurements and methods are used to identify the relationship between education and family behavior, Students will be able to evaluate how empirical evidence is robust. Second, students will learn about different theories that explain why education has specific relationships with family behavior. Finally, students will have an opportunity to conduct their own research (in the format of either an empirical or a review paper) by choosing a specific context where they will first document the relationship between education and family behavior and apply theories to explain the relationship with explicit consideration of specific contextual factors.
DEMG5970401, SOCI5970401
SOCI 2290-401 Advanced Topics in Family Sociology Pilar Gonalons-Pons R 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This course will focus on the intersection of family life and inequality. The course will cover theories and empirical research examining the ways in which the political economy of family life is implicated in sustaining and organizing inequalities by class, gender, sexuality, and race. DEMG5240401, SOCI5240401
SOCI 2420-001 Social Problems and Public Policy Jerry A Jacobs TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course approaches some of today's important social and political issues from a sociological vantage point. The course begins by asking where social problems come from. The main sociological perspectives of Marx, Weber and Durkheim are developed in connection with the issues of inequality, social conflict and community. We then turn to the social construction of social problems by examining how various issues become defined as social problems. This involves a consideration of the role of the media, social experts and social movements. The last section of the course considers how social problems are addressed. Here we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of government programs and regulations versus market-based approached. We also discuss the role of philanthropy and volunteerism. Finally, we consider the risk of unanticipated consequences of reforms. Along the way, we will consider a variety of social issues and social problems, including poverty, immigration, crime, global warming, and education. Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 2902-401 The US and Human Rights: Policies and Pratices Hocine Fetni M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM After an examination of the philosophical, legal, and political perspectives on Human Rights, this course will focus on US policies and practices relevant to Human Rights. Toward that end, emphasis will be placed on both the domestic and the international aspects of Human Rights as reflected in US policies and practices. Domestically, the course will discuss (1) the process of incorporating the International Bill of Human Rights into the American legal system and (2) the US position on and practices regarding the political, civil, economic, social, and cultural rights of minorities and various other groups within the US. Internationally, the course will examine US Human Rights policies toward Africa. Specific cases of Rwanda, Kenya, South Africa, and Egypt, as well as other cases from the continent, will be presented in the assessment of US successes and failures in the pursuit of its Human Rights strategy in Africa. Readings will include research papers, reports, statutes, treaties, and cases. AFRC4200401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 2904-401 Oil to Diamonds: The Political Economy of Natural Resources in Africa Adewale Adebanwi R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course examines the ways in which the processes of the extraction, refining, sale and use of natural resources – including oil and diamond – in Africa produce complex regional and global dynamics. We explore how values are placed on resources, how such values, the regimes of valuation, commodification and the social formations that are (re)produced by these regimes lead to cooperation and conflict in the contemporary African state, including in the relationships of resource-rich African countries with global powers. Specific cases will be examined against the backdrop of theoretical insights to encourage comparative analyses beyond Africa. Some audio-visual materials will be used to enhance the understanding of the political economy and sociality of natural resources. AFRC4500401, AFRC5700401, ANTH3045401, ANTH5700401, PSCI4130401, SOCI5700401
SOCI 2910-401 Globalization And Its Historical Significance TR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course sets the current state of globalization in historical perspective. It applies the concepts of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the study of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening, but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of this increasing awareness. In answering these questions we draw on a variety of case studies, from historical examples of early globalization (e.g. The Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds, global flows of conspicuous commodities such as sugar, coffee, and tea, the rise and transformations of early capitalism), to issues facing our current globalized world (e.g. mass-mediatization and multilingualism, border regimes and international migration, planetary urbanization). The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught by anthropologists who draw from economic, linguistic, sociocultural, archaeological, and historical perspectives, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH0120401 Humanties & Social Science Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
SOCI 2910-402 Globalization And Its Historical Significance T 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course sets the current state of globalization in historical perspective. It applies the concepts of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the study of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening, but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of this increasing awareness. In answering these questions we draw on a variety of case studies, from historical examples of early globalization (e.g. The Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds, global flows of conspicuous commodities such as sugar, coffee, and tea, the rise and transformations of early capitalism), to issues facing our current globalized world (e.g. mass-mediatization and multilingualism, border regimes and international migration, planetary urbanization). The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught by anthropologists who draw from economic, linguistic, sociocultural, archaeological, and historical perspectives, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH0120402 Cross Cultural Analysis
Humanties & Social Science Sector
SOCI 2910-403 Globalization And Its Historical Significance W 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course sets the current state of globalization in historical perspective. It applies the concepts of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the study of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening, but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of this increasing awareness. In answering these questions we draw on a variety of case studies, from historical examples of early globalization (e.g. The Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds, global flows of conspicuous commodities such as sugar, coffee, and tea, the rise and transformations of early capitalism), to issues facing our current globalized world (e.g. mass-mediatization and multilingualism, border regimes and international migration, planetary urbanization). The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught by anthropologists who draw from economic, linguistic, sociocultural, archaeological, and historical perspectives, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH0120403 Cross Cultural Analysis
Humanties & Social Science Sector
SOCI 2910-404 Globalization And Its Historical Significance W 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course sets the current state of globalization in historical perspective. It applies the concepts of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the study of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening, but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of this increasing awareness. In answering these questions we draw on a variety of case studies, from historical examples of early globalization (e.g. The Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds, global flows of conspicuous commodities such as sugar, coffee, and tea, the rise and transformations of early capitalism), to issues facing our current globalized world (e.g. mass-mediatization and multilingualism, border regimes and international migration, planetary urbanization). The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught by anthropologists who draw from economic, linguistic, sociocultural, archaeological, and historical perspectives, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH0120404 Cross Cultural Analysis
Humanties & Social Science Sector
SOCI 2910-406 Globalization And Its Historical Significance R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course sets the current state of globalization in historical perspective. It applies the concepts of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the study of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening, but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of this increasing awareness. In answering these questions we draw on a variety of case studies, from historical examples of early globalization (e.g. The Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds, global flows of conspicuous commodities such as sugar, coffee, and tea, the rise and transformations of early capitalism), to issues facing our current globalized world (e.g. mass-mediatization and multilingualism, border regimes and international migration, planetary urbanization). The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught by anthropologists who draw from economic, linguistic, sociocultural, archaeological, and historical perspectives, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH0120405 Cross Cultural Analysis
Humanties & Social Science Sector
SOCI 2910-407 Globalization And Its Historical Significance F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course sets the current state of globalization in historical perspective. It applies the concepts of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the study of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening, but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of this increasing awareness. In answering these questions we draw on a variety of case studies, from historical examples of early globalization (e.g. The Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds, global flows of conspicuous commodities such as sugar, coffee, and tea, the rise and transformations of early capitalism), to issues facing our current globalized world (e.g. mass-mediatization and multilingualism, border regimes and international migration, planetary urbanization). The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught by anthropologists who draw from economic, linguistic, sociocultural, archaeological, and historical perspectives, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH0120406 Cross Cultural Analysis
Humanties & Social Science Sector
SOCI 2910-408 Globalization And Its Historical Significance F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course sets the current state of globalization in historical perspective. It applies the concepts of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the study of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening, but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of this increasing awareness. In answering these questions we draw on a variety of case studies, from historical examples of early globalization (e.g. The Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds, global flows of conspicuous commodities such as sugar, coffee, and tea, the rise and transformations of early capitalism), to issues facing our current globalized world (e.g. mass-mediatization and multilingualism, border regimes and international migration, planetary urbanization). The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught by anthropologists who draw from economic, linguistic, sociocultural, archaeological, and historical perspectives, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural. ANTH0120407 Cross Cultural Analysis
Humanties & Social Science Sector
SOCI 2920-401 Criminology Charles E Loeffler MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This introductory course examines the multi-disciplinary science of law-making, law-breaking, and law-enforcing. It reviews theories and data predicting where, when, by whom and against whom crimes happen. It also addresses the prevention of different offense types by different kinds of offenders against different kinds of people. Police, courts, prisons, and other institutions are critically examined as both preventing and causing crime. This course meets the general distribution requirement. CRIM1000401 Society Sector
SOCI 2931-401 Latinx Communities and the Role of CBO's in Social Change Johnny Irizarry W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM The purpose of this course to create a Latino Studies/Service Learning ABCS course that cultivates dialogue and knowledge about the social, political, cultural and historical complexities of the Latinx experience in the United States (Philadelphia in particular) and the roles Latinx CBO's play in meeting the needs of Latinx communities and in impacting social change. LALS4240401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 2944-401 Perspectives on Urban Poverty Robert P Fairbanks M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to 20th century urban poverty, and 20th century urban poverty knowledge. In addition to providing an historical overview of American poverty, the course is primarily concerned with the ways in which historical, cultural, political, racial, social, spatial/geographical, and economic forces have either shaped or been left out of contemporary debates on urban poverty. Of great importance, the course will evaluate competing analytic trends in the social sciences and their respective implications in terms of the question of what can be known about urban poverty in the contexts of social policy and practice, academic research, and the broader social imaginary. We will critically analyze a wide body of literature that theorizes and explains urban poverty. Course readings span the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, urban studies, history, and social welfare. Primacy will be granted to critical analysis and deconstruction of course texts, particularly with regard to the ways in which poverty knowledge creates, sustains, and constricts meaningful channels of action in urban poverty policy and practice interventions. HIST0812401, URBS4200401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
SOCI 2960-401 Participatory Cities Marisa Lee Denker T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM What is a participatory city? What has that term meant in the past, what does it mean now, and what will it mean going forward? Against the backdrop of increasing inequality and inequity, and the rise in a search for solutions, what role can citizens play in co-creating more just cities and neighborhoods? How can citizens be engaged in the decision-making processes about the places where we live, work, and play? And most importantly, how can we work to make sure that all kinds of voices are meaningfully included, and that historically muted voices are elevated to help pave a better path forward? This course will connect theory with praxis as we explore together the history, challenges, methods, and approaches, and impact of bottom up and top down approaches to community participation and stakeholder involvement in cities. Multiple opportunities will be provided to be involved in community engagement work for live projects in Philadelphia. URBS3140401
SOCI 2973-401 Culture on Trial: Race, Media & Intellectual Property Joseph M Coppola TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course explores the US intellectual property regime’s impact on the production, distribution and consumption of media and art. We will consider intellectual property’s seminal role in the formation of emerging media landscapes including cinema, television, social media, and new streaming platforms. We will also develop an understanding of how the structural commitments of the law — copyright, trademark, and patents — contribute to racial hierarchy, economic inequality, and environmental injustice. Topics include intellectual property’s ability to manage Civil Rights discourse on film, television, and the web; examining how copyright has historically deprived Black artists of control over their works; the role of the “author” in the age of artificial intelligence; and the racial disparities of intellectual property on global ecological crises. By the end of the class, students will come away with historical, theoretical, and practical understandings of how media technology changes the law and how the law has subsequently responded to changes in media technology. This course is affiliated with CWIC (Communication Within the Curriculum). CIMS2935401, ENGL2935401
SOCI 3000-001 Sociological Theory Stephen R Viscelli W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This course will introduce students to sociological theory until the 1970s. We will read excerpts of original works from key theorists in, or influencing, the discipline. We will read original works of Tocqueville, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, DuBois, Gramsci, Marcuse, C. Wright Mills and more. We will also read a few more recent works echoing classical theory. The goal of this course is to help students understand the core concepts, including those of class, race, power, markets and the state, in classical sociological theory and to sharpen their own sociological imaginations.
SOCI 3200-001 Field Methods of Sociological Research Stephen R Viscelli R 10:15 AM-1:14 PM This course is designed to introduce students to field methods in sociological research, with a focus on participant-observation and interviewing. During this course, students will read original research based on field methods and discuss their strengths, limitations, and ethical dilemmas. Most importantly, students will design their own research projects and become ethnographers and interviewers. Students will be guided through the fieldwork process from data collection to analysis, and will turn in multiple assignments and original research paper.
SOCI 4101-001 Thesis Workshop II Chenoa A Flippen This is the second part of the Thesis Workshop course. Prerequisite: SOCI 4100. Permission must be granted by the department. Perm Needed From Department https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=SOCI4101001
SOCI 4998-001 Honors Independent Study Melissa J Wilde Independent study section for senior Sociology majors working on an honors thesis. Students are assigned an advisor by the undergraduate chair.
SOCI 5240-401 Advanced Topics in Family Sociology Pilar Gonalons-Pons R 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This course will focus on the intersection of family life and inequality. The course will cover theories and empirical research examining the ways in which the political economy of family life is implicated in sustaining and organizing inequalities by class, gender, sexuality, and race. DEMG5240401, SOCI2290401
SOCI 5330-401 Sociology of Race and Ethnicity Tukufu Zuberi W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Race and ethnicity are, above all, both converge as system of ideas by which men and women imagine the human body and their relationships within society. In this course we will question the concept of race and ethnicity and their place in modern society (1500 - 2020). While the course reviews the pre-1500 literature our focus will be on the last 500 years. This course reviews the research that has contributed to the ideas about ethnicity and race in human society. The review covers the discourse on race in political propaganda, religious doctrine, philosophy, history, biology and other human sciences. AFRC5330401, DEMG5330401
SOCI 5350-401 Quantitative Methods I Hans-Peter Kohler TR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is an introduction to the practice of statistics in social and behavioral sciences. It is open to beginning graduate students and--with the permission of the instructor--advanced undergraduates. Topics covered include the description of social science data, in graphical and non-graphical form; correlation and other forms of association, including cross-tabulation; bivariate regression; an introduction to probability theory; the logic of sampling; the logic of statistical inference and significance tests. There is a lecture twice weekly and a mandatory "lab." DEMG5350401
SOCI 5350-402 Quantitative Methods I F 8:30 AM-9:29 AM This course is an introduction to the practice of statistics in social and behavioral sciences. It is open to beginning graduate students and--with the permission of the instructor--advanced undergraduates. Topics covered include the description of social science data, in graphical and non-graphical form; correlation and other forms of association, including cross-tabulation; bivariate regression; an introduction to probability theory; the logic of sampling; the logic of statistical inference and significance tests. There is a lecture twice weekly and a mandatory "lab." DEMG5350402
SOCI 5350-403 Quantitative Methods I F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is an introduction to the practice of statistics in social and behavioral sciences. It is open to beginning graduate students and--with the permission of the instructor--advanced undergraduates. Topics covered include the description of social science data, in graphical and non-graphical form; correlation and other forms of association, including cross-tabulation; bivariate regression; an introduction to probability theory; the logic of sampling; the logic of statistical inference and significance tests. There is a lecture twice weekly and a mandatory "lab." DEMG5350403
SOCI 5700-401 Oil to Diamonds: The Political Economy of Natural Resources in Africa Adewale Adebanwi R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course examines the ways in which the processes of the extraction, refining, sale and use of natural resources – including oil and diamond – in Africa produce complex regional and global dynamics. We explore how values are placed on resources, how such values, the regimes of valuation, commodification and the social formations that are (re)produced by these regimes lead to cooperation and conflict in the contemporary African state, including in the relationships of resource-rich African countries with global powers. Specific cases will be examined against the backdrop of theoretical insights to encourage comparative analyses beyond Africa. Some audio-visual materials will be used to enhance the understanding of the political economy and sociality of natural resources. AFRC4500401, AFRC5700401, ANTH3045401, ANTH5700401, PSCI4130401, SOCI2904401
SOCI 5960-001 Sociology of Education Emily Hannum M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This graduate seminar will introduce students to some of the key theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of education. We will examine how schools work to maintain or alleviate inequality, and focus on differences in educational achievement and attainment by race, ethnicity, immigrant status, class, and gender. We will review work on the educational experiences of youth from early childhood to young adulthood.
SOCI 5970-401 Demography of Education Hyunjoon Park T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The major topic of the course is the impacts of education, especially college education, on various kinds of family behavior such as dating, cohabitation, living arrangements, marriage, fertility, parenting, divorce, and remarriage. In many countries, some family behaviors, if not all, are increasingly differentiated between college-educated and non-college-educated. For instance, increase in divorce is more evident among the less educated than their more educated counterparts, while marriage decline is more substantial among the less educated. Although parents’ time and money investments in children’s education have generally increased over time for both college-educated and non-college-educated parents, the increase is much more substantial among college-educated parents than their non-college-educated counterparts, leading to divergence. In such societies, college education has increasingly differentiated population with respect to family behavior, which has important implications for inequality of children’s well-being. Of course, such diverging family behavior is not observed every society. In some countries, educational differentiation in family behavior is minimal.
In this course, students first will be able to have a global perspective on education and family behavior by reviewing empirical evidence of the relationship between education and various kinds of family behavior across a variety of countries. After learning how different measurements and methods are used to identify the relationship between education and family behavior, Students will be able to evaluate how empirical evidence is robust. Second, students will learn about different theories that explain why education has specific relationships with family behavior. Finally, students will have an opportunity to conduct their own research (in the format of either an empirical or a review paper) by choosing a specific context where they will first document the relationship between education and family behavior and apply theories to explain the relationship with explicit consideration of specific contextual factors.
The proposed course will be open to undergraduate and graduate students with different assignments to each of undergraduate and graduate students.
DEMG5970401, SOCI2281401
SOCI 6020-001 Proseminar in Classical Sociology David I Grazian W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the classical foundations of sociology by drawing on canonical readings by Marx, Engels, Durkheim, Weber, Du Bois, Addams, Simmel, Park, and Goffman, among others. We will read these texts in the context of three major sociological themes: work and social inequality, culture and social structure, and urban interaction and culture in the city. Final papers will require students to draw on classical sociological works in their analyses of contemporary empirical research in sociology.
SOCI 6070-401 Introduction to Demography Michel Guillot T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM A nontechnical introduction to fertility, mortality and migration and the interrelations of population with other social and economic factors. DEMG6070401
SOCI 6090-401 Basic Demographic Methods Michel Guillot M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The course is designed to introduce students to basic concepts of demographic measurement and modeling used to study changes in population size and composition. The course covers basic measures of mortality, fertility and migration; life table construction; multiple decrement life tables; stable populations; population projections; and age patterns of vital events. Students will learn to apply demographic methods through a series of weekly problem sets. DEMG6090401
SOCI 6490-001 A Course on Elites Annette Lareau CANCELED Most of the studies of inequality look at poverty and the impact of poverty. This course will be a study of those at the top of the social stratification system. We will take a broad vision of elites of to include the upper-middle-class as well as those in the top 1%. The course will examine the concentration of wealth in American society. It will examine elite families. It will also look at elite education. There will be a unit on the financial industry, the 2008 debacle, and the failure of the government to regulate this important industry. We will also study the influence of race by comparing the black upper-middle-class with white upper-middle-class families. Thus, we will also look at the power of elites in a number of spheres. Finally, we will also read theoretical perspectives including the work of C. Wright Mills, Marx, and Bourdieu. Thus, in addition to the focus on social stratification, this course cuts across sociology of the family, economic sociology, cultural sociology, and race and ethnic relations.
SOCI 6620-401 Panel Data Analysis Xi Song MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course focuses on the ability to use, analyze, and understand panel data. Panel data contain repeated measurements of the dependent variable for the same individuals, and possibly repeated measurements of the predictor variables as well. Panel data offer important opportunities for controlling unobserved variables and for answering questions about causal ordering. DEMG6620401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=SOCI6620401
SOCI 7468-401 Ethnographic Research Methods Robert G Gonzales R 12:00 PM-2:59 PM A course in ethnographic participant observational research; its substantive orientation, literature, and methods. Emphasis is on the interpretive study of social organization and culture in educational settings, formal and informal. Methods of data collection and analysis, critical review of examples of ethnographic research reports, and research design and proposal preparation are among the topics and activities included in this course. Prerequisite: This course is designed to follow after Qualitative Modes of Inquiry (EDUC 682) and as such it is suggested that students have some background in qualitative methods before enrolling. EDUC7468401
SOCI 8810-401 The Performance Society: Readings in Social and Media Theories Guobin Yang W 3:30 PM-5:29 PM Social action has a performative character - people act as if on a stage in response to audience expectations, whether offline or online. This seminar traces the history of this line of critical thought from Weber and Bakhtin through Goffman and Victor Turner to contemporary authors such as Judith Butler, Byung-Chul Han, Jon McKenzie, and Charles Tilly. Special attention will be devoted to the relationship between media and performance, examined through recent work by media scholars and sociologists such as Ben Agger, Jeffrey Alexander, Jeffrey Berry, Danah Boyd, Alice Marwick, and Sarah Sobieraj. A central issue concerns the will to perform. Why are individuals in modern society compelled to perform? What are the manifestations and forms of performance in institutional and non-institutional politics (such as revolutions and social movements)? How are performances related to emotion? How do the internet and digital media shape the forms and meanings of performance? What are the consequences of the performance imperative? A term paper is required. COMM8810401
SOCI 9950-001 Dissertation Emily Hannum Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-003 Dissertation Annette Lareau Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-004 Dissertation Chenoa A Flippen Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-009 Dissertation Irma Elo Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-010 Dissertation Jason S Schnittker Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-013 Dissertation Tukufu Zuberi Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-014 Dissertation Hans-Peter Kohler Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-018 Dissertation Guobin Yang Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-019 Dissertation Hyunjoon Park Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-020 Dissertation Robin Lisa Leidner Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-023 Dissertation Michel Guillot Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-024 Dissertation Pilar Gonalons-Pons Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-025 Dissertation Benjamin J Shestakofsky Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-027 Dissertation Jerry A Jacobs Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-032 Dissertation David I Grazian Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-033 Dissertation Camille Charles Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-036 Dissertation Melissa J Wilde Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-037 Dissertation Emilio Alberto Parrado Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-040 Dissertation Dorothy E Roberts Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-041 Dissertation Wendy Roth Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-043 Dissertation Courtney E Boen Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-046 Dissertation Xi Song Designated course code for dissertation status.
SOCI 9950-048 Dissertation Robert G Gonzales Designated course code for dissertation status.